To: CNS Editors

From: Eric Freedman

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Pechulano Ali, (517) 940-2313, pechulan@msu.edu.

For other issues contact Perry Parks, perryrobertparks@gmail.com, (517) 388-8627.

1st SUMMER ENVIRONMENTAL NEWS PACKAGES: This is the first of the summer’s three regular packages of Michigan environmental stories for CNS members, in partnership with Great Lakes Echo.

Here is your file:

TRACKFISH: Biologists and scientists teamed up to track fish across the Great Lakes using sound— like the world’s biggest game of Marco Polo, but with fish. The Great Lakes Acoustic Telemetry Observation Systems is a network of researchers sharing fish-tracking data. We interview experts from the Hammond Bay Biological Station near Lake Huron, Grand Valley State and MSU. By Max Johnston. FOR ALCONA, LUDINGTON, MANISTEE, HARBOR SPRINGS, LEELANAU, PETOSKEY, HARBOR SPRINGS, ST. IGNACE, SAULT STE. MARIE, HOLLAND, MANISTEE, CHEBOYGAN, TRAVERSE CITY, OCEANA, BAY MILLS & ALL POINTS. Continue reading

Fast green locomotives coming to Michigan

By KAREN HOPPER USHER

Capital News Service

LANSING — Greener trains are coming to the Great Lakes region.

Technically, they’re locomotives. That’s the part of the train that does the pushing or the pulling. The Siemens Chargers, which are due to arrive by fall, meet the Environmental Protection Agency’s “tier four” standards.

Tier four is the agency’s highest standard for emissions.

Besides leaving a smaller carbon footprint, the locomotives can get up to speed faster than older models. A 94-mile section of track between Porter, Indiana, and Kalamazoo, Michigan, for example, could see trains flying through at 110 miles per hour without a long acceleration period. Continue reading

Scientists team up to track fish

By MAX JOHNSTON

Capital News Service

LANSING — Biologists and scientists have teamed up to track fish across the Great Lakes using sound—a literal Great Lakes echo.

It’s like the world’s biggest game of Marco Polo, but with fish.

The Great Lakes Acoustic Telemetry Observation Systems, or GLATOS, is a network of researchers sharing fish-tracking data from across the Great Lakes basin.

Acoustic telemetry tracks fish by surgically inserting a tracker into them before releasing them back into the water. As the fish travels, it emits an audible ping that can be picked up by markers placed in bodies of water across the region. Continue reading

UP scientists writes guide to fruit flies

By CARIN TUNNEY

Capital News Service

LANSING — A common ancestor of fruit flies and humans emerged about 600 million years ago, long before the formation of the earth’s continents as we know them today.

Scientists discovered the link in the early 1900s, opening the floodgates to genetic research.

Fruit flies are cheap, grow rapidly and are easy to mutate. Their genetic likeness to humans allows researchers to study diseases like cancer, diabetes and immune resistance.

That makes them a model species for genetic research, said Thomas Werner, a professor of genetics and developmental biology at Michigan Technological University.

Werner recently co-authored a book “Drosophilids of the Midwest and Northeast,” which gives fruit flies overdue accolades. Continue reading

Seeking ‘Eureka!’ cries to solve environmental problems

By TALITHA TUKURA PAM

Capital News Service

LANSING — The state’s $1 million incentive for anyone who comes up with a new and innovative solution to prevent Asian carp from entering the Great Lakes.is part of a trend in using cash incentives to crowdsource and solve natural resource problems.

For instance, Michigan State University recently sponsored a challenge to redesign water foundations. The winning team won $15,000.

“The students are innovative and energetic and we were very excited to support student team learning and effort through problem solving,” said Professor Joan Rose, an MSU expert in water quality and public health safety.

Another example: The Michigan Design Council has sponsored contests for K-12 students to develop products to better enjoy the state’s water and winter. Continue reading

Invasive species gang up on native crayfish

By NATASHA BLAKELY

Capital News Service

LANSING — Invasive species in the Great Lakes are ganging up against native species.

A new study looking into invasive zebra and quagga mussels’ relationship with invasive rusty crayfish illustrates how the harm they cause together can be greater than either of them alone.

“What we found was that these invasive crayfish are really good at exploiting the resources provided by the (invasive) mussels,” said Mael Glon, who worked on this research while pursuing a master’s degree at Central Michigan University. “I don’t just mean eating them, because they are eating them, but they’re also eating what grows from what’s filtered from the mussels.”

The study was a collaboration between Central Michigan University (CMU) and Chicago’s Shedd Aquarium. It tested how the presence of the invasive mussels affected the growth and activity of both the invasive rusty crayfish and the native virile crayfish. The study funded by Michigan Sea Grant found that the mussels’ presence led to increased growth and activity of the invasive crayfish, but not the native ones. Continue reading

Detroit architect honored in new book

By STEVEN MAIER

Capital News Service

LANSING — Admirers of architect Wirt Rowland finally have the biography they were looking for. It was a long time coming.

Rowland was arguably the premier skyscraper architect of the early 20th century. He designed prominent buildings around the country for years. Yet his name is hardly known outside of architectural circles, and no one had bothered to write a book about the man.

That’s what struck Michael G. Smith of Bloomfield Hills and led him to write the just-released, “Designing Detroit: Wirt Rowland and the Rise of Modern American Architecture” (Wayne State University Press, $44.99).

The tome is comprehensive and meticulously detailed as Smith explores the rise of Rowland through the ranks of the architectural world and his work in Detroit. Despite his lack of training, Rowland earned a position in the city as an apprentice draftsman in 1901. Four years later, he was the lead designer for the two largest construction projects in Michigan. He went on to work for some of the most prominent architectural firms in the city, designing five of Detroit’s 16 prominent skyscrapers Continue reading

Two species – one to preserve, one to control – challenge dam removal

By IAN WENDROW

Capital News Service

LANSING — A proposed dam removal along the Grand River faces significant delays due to its potential to disrupt river ecosystems. The environmental risks involve the fate of two species: sea lamprey and snuffbox mussels.

One needs to be kept out while the other needs to be protected.

The Sixth Street Dam in downtown Grand Rapids was installed in the mid-1800s to help ship milled logs downstream by controlling the water’s height and flow. It drowned the river’s naturally occurring rapids, allowing logs to float over them.

Eventually log transportation no longer relied on the river, but the dam remained.

Years of inadequate maintenance began to pose a hazard to kayakers and swimmers. In 2013, firefighters rescued two kayakers after the bumped against the dam and capsized. This and other accidents motivated city and state agencies to get the removal process going in earnest. Continue reading

May 30, 2017 CNS Budget

To: CNS Editors

From: Eric Freedman & Dave Poulson

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Pechulano Ali, (517) 940-2313, pechulan@msu.edu.

For other questions contact Eric Freedman, freedma5@msu.edu, (517) 355-4729.

CLIMATE CHANGE PACKAGE: CNS, in partnership with Great Lakes Echo, is providing a special six-story package of Michigan-focused stories about climate change. Each story can stand alone, be run as a series or be run as a package.

1st REGULAR SUMMER ENVIRONMENTAL NEWS PACKAGE AHEAD: Our first package of Michigan environmental stories for CNS members in partnership with Great Lakes Echo will move in early June.

Here is your file:

CLIMATEPACKAGE1MICHIGANIMPACT. Is Michigan the place to weather the climate? Tough call. On average, the Great Lakes region is 2 two degrees warmer than in 1912, according to MSU- U of M’s Great Lakes Integrated Sciences Assessment. “You’re literally looking at an ecological experiment taking place in front of our eyes,” the state climatologist says. By Jack Nissen & Karen Hopper Usher. FOR ALL POINTS. Continue reading

5 things to prepare for climate change

By KAREN HOPPER USHER

Capital News Service

LANSING — Climate change can feel daunting. What’s an ordinary person supposed to do about chemicals in the air making the planet radically hotter?

While it’s true that there are things you can do to leave a smaller footprint on the planet–walk more, waste less — some scientists think we could be close to the point of no return.

If climate change is inevitable, though, that doesn’t mean the consequences can’t be managed. In fact, a number of state officials and academics are planning ahead to help people cope with the effects of climate change.

Here are five things the state of Michigan does to make climate change easier to bear. This list is not exhaustive. Continue reading