CNS Budget – April 27, 2018

April 27, 2018 – Week 1

To: CNS Editors

From: Eric Freedman & Sheila Schimpf

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Tony Cepak at (517) 803-6841; cepak@msu.edu.

For other matters, contact CNS Director Eric Freedman at (517) 355-4729 or (517) 256-3873; freedma5@msu.edu.

 

LAST REGULAR FILE FOR THE SPRING: This is our final regular weekly file of the spring semester. You’re welcome to continue using prior stories and visuals from our website.

 

UPCOMING: On Wednesday, May 2, CNS will move a special package of articles about campaign financing reported by our partner, Spartan Newsroom.

 

ALSO UPCOMING: On Friday, May  4, CNS will move its end-of-semester Bonus Week budget. These are still-timely stories you may not have had space for when they were first reported.

 

MORE UPCOMING: During the summer we plan to move several packages of Michigan-related environmental stories in partnership with Great Lakes Echo.

 

Here’s your file:

 

EARLYLITERACY: Children should be developing literacy skills starting at birth but many parents don’t realize that ages 0 to 3 are critical for future reading success. Michigan is among the bottom 10 states for early literacy. We hear from  the Kent and Ingham intermediate school districts and the MEA. By Agnes Bao. FOR LANSING CITY PULSE, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS AND ALL POINTS.

 

BROOKTROUT: Angling for brook trout? Fourteen U.P. counties — Menominee is the sole exception — now have at least one stream where the daily bag limit for brook trout is five  rather than 10. In total, part or all of 36 U.P. streams have the higher limit. DNR explains. By Kaley Fech. FOR SAULT STE. MARIE, ST. IGNACE, MARQUETTE, BAY MILLS, CHEBOYGAN AND ALL POINTS.

w/BROOKTROUTPHOTO: A spring brook trout catch from the Upper Peninsula. Credit: Michigan.gov

 

IMPROVINGSCHOOLS: Thirty-eight of Michigan lowest-performing schools are about to wrap up their first year under a partnership program created to keep them open They had been in the bottom 5 percent for academic performance. They include schools in Lansing, Detroit, Kalamazoo, Benton Harbor, Saginaw and Pontiac. By Maxwell Evans. FOR LANSING CITY PULSE AND ALL POINTS.

 

AFFORDABLEHOUSING: Michigan has a shortage of affordable rental homes for extremely low-income households, according to a national report and the Michigan Coalition Against Homelessness. We talk to a Ludington-based shelter organization and Grand Rapids real estate experts. By Gloria Nzeka. FOR LUDINGTON, OCEANA, MANISTEE, CADILLAC,  LANSING CITY PULSE, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, LAKE COUNTY AND ALL POINTS.

 

LICENSING: A new Mackinac Center for Public Policy report says Michigan unnecessarily requires licenses for too many occupations. A legislator from Mancelona says the state is too heavily regulated, but the Michigan Economic Impact Coalition says some occupations that should be licensed aren’t. The lieutenant governor says it’s important to streamline the licensing process. By Crystal Chen. FOR GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, PETOSKEY, MONTMORENCY AND ALL POINTS.

 

WINE: Predictions are that wine prices will rise because of global problems facing the industry, with 2017 production at its lowest level in 60 years amid poor crops caused by bad weather and wildfires. What does that mean for the prices of Michigan wines? The president of an Old Mission Peninsula winery discusses. By Riley Murdock. FOR LEELANAU, TRAVERSE CITY, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS AND ALL POINTS.

 

AUTISMEMPLOYMENT: There’s a high unemployment rate for Michigan adults with autism. Lt. Gov. Calley says the special education system needs improvements to help reduce that rate. We also hear from the Michigan Protection and Advocacy Service and a nonprofit community rehabilitation organization in Sault Ste. Marie. By Maxwell Evans. FOR SAULT STE. MARIE, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, CHEBOYGAN AND ALL POINTS.

 

SOLARBILLING: A new order by the Public Service Commission will reduce savings for homes deciding to generate electricity from solar energy, possibly creating a disincentive for homeowners to install solar systems. Some legislators, including ones from Ann Arbor, Potterville and Calumet, want to block it. We also talk to Consumers Energy, the PSC and the Great Lakes Renewable Energy Association. By Casey Hull. FOR MARQUETTE, SAULT STE. MARIE, LANSING CITY PULSE, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS AND ALL POINTS.

 

SCHOOLDISCIPLINE: A new national study by the General Accountability Office finds that black students, boys and children with disabilities are disproportionately disciplined with suspensions and expulsions. in K-12 public schools. That’s true in Michigan as well, according to the head of the state Civil Rights Department and the ACLU. By Gloria Nzeka. FOR LANSING CITY PULSE AND ALL POINTS.

 

ELECTRICCARS: Michigan is moving to better accommodate electric cars with upcoming pilot programs by DTE Energy and Consumers Energy. The Michigan Electric Auto Association, Consumers Energy and the Public Service Commission explain. By Riley Murdock. FOR GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS AND ALL POINTS.

 

PLASTICSTRAWS: Americans use lots and lots of plastic straws, and that’s bad for the environment. Some grassroots group, including ones in Traverse City and Ann Arbor, are pushing to limit them and some restaurants are complying. We talk to the Great Lakes Environmental Center in Traverse City, an MSU expert and an activist.  By Agnes Bao. FOR TRAVERSE CITY, LEELANAU, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS AND ALL POINTS.

 

OPIOIDS: The president announced a national opioid emergency last October, but Michigan started tackling the crisis before that. We hear from a Monroe lawmaker who wrote the law making it tougher for children to be prescribed opioids, from Lt. Gov. Calley, from the Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs and from the Michigan Opioid Prescribing Engagement Network. By Colton WOOD. FOR ALL POINTS.

 

MONARCHS: State agencies and their partners are working to save the declining monarch butterfly, which is threatened by the black swallow-wort, an invasive vine that resembles the milkweed plants that monarchs need to eat. The invader is found mostly in Southern Michigan but has been spotted in the Grand Traverse, Emmet, Delta and Cheboygan counties. We talk to DNR experts and North County Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area that covers .

Lake, Mason, Mecosta, Missaukee, Osceola and Wexford counties. By Casey Hull. FOR LAKE COUNTY, BIG RAPIDS, CADILLAC, LUDINGTON, MARQUETTE, SAULT STE. MARIE, BAY MILLS, HERALD-REVIEW, CHEBOYGAN, TRAVERSE CITY, PETOSKEY AND ALL POINTS.

w/MONARCHSPHOTO1: Black swallow-wort. Credit: Leslie Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut

w/MONARCHSPHOTO2: Monarch on milkweed. Credit: Michigan State University Extension.

 

FOURDAYSCHOOLS: Some states are moving toward a four-day school week, but Michigan districts show no such trend. The Education Department says only two districts, in Newaygo and Iron counties, have four-day schedules. We also talk to the Michigan Association of School Boards. By Agnes Bao. FOR BIG RAPIDS, MARQUETTE, SAULT STE. MARIE AND ALL POINTS.

 

TERMLIMITS: Are term-limited legislators lazier than colleagues who can run again? A new national study finds that legislators who can no longer seek reelection sponsor fewer bills, are less productive on committees and are absent for more floor votes, on average. This year Michigan has 23 term-limited representatives and 25 term-limited senators. Commentary. For news and editorial pages. By Eric Freedman. FOR ALL POINTS.

 

WETLANDS: What’s good for the goose – and the duck and the swan – is good for the frog.

A new study done in Ontario and Michigan finds that waterfowl aren’t the only beneficiaries of wetlands management projects and restoration–many other bird and frog species benefit too. Meanwhile, Ducks Unlimited and its partners are working on restoration projects around the state, including recent ones in Lenawee, Manistee, Mason and St. Clair counties and the Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge. By Eric Freedman. FOR BLISSFIELD, LUDINGTON, MANISTEE AND ALL POINTS.

 

RIVERS&SOYBEANS: What do Chinese soybean farmers have in common with the health of Michigan’s rivers and fish populations? While their relationship may not seem obvious, both are now studied through an emerging concept in scientific research called telecoupling. MSU experts. By Lauren Caramagno. FOR ALL POINTS.

w/RIVERS&SOYBEANSPHOTO: Researchers studied the North Branch of the Paint River in the Upper Peninsula to help develop the decision-support tool. Credit: Andrew Carlson.

 

QUAGGAS: Scientists using GoPro cameras attached to dedges are documenting the troubling extent of the invasive quagga mussels in Lake Michigan. “It’s like a continuous carpet across the lake,” Great Lakes Environmental Research Lab scientist says. By Kate Hambrel. FOR LUDINGTON, MANISTEE, OCEANA, BENZIE, TRAVERSE CITY, PETOSKEY, CHEBOYGAN, HARBOR SPRINGS, LEELANAU, HOLLAND AND ALL POINTS..

w/QUAGGASPHOTO1: Collecting samples on Lake Michigan. Credit: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

w/QUAGGASPHOTO2: Quagga mussels collected in a benthic trawl on board the USGS Sturgeon as part of 2015 Lake Michigan Cooperative Science and Monitoring Initiative research. Credit: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

 

CATTLETRACKING: Michigan is among the first states to track cattle with ear tags that emit radio signals, a system livestock officials say should be adopted nationwide to track disease outbreaks. The system is important as foreign markets increasingly require such tracking for imported beef. We talk to a Sturgis livestock producer, a Michigan State University animal science professor and a livestock specialist at Michigan Farm Bureau. By Crystal Chen. FOR STURGIS, THREE RIVERS AND ALL POINTS.

 

CNS

CNS Budget – April 20, 2018

April 20, 2018 – Week 13

To: CNS Editors

From: Eric Freedman & Sheila Schimpf

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Tony Cepak at (517) 803-6841; cepak@msu.edu.

For other matters, contact CNS Director Eric Freedman at (517) 355-4729 or (517) 256-3873; freedma5@msu.edu.

UPCOMING #1 FOR EDITORS: Next Friday, April 27, will be our final regular weekly file of the spring semester. You’re welcome to continue using prior stories and visuals from our website.

UPCOMING #2 FOR EDITORS: On Wednesday, May 2, CNS will move a special package of articles about campaign financing reported by our partner, Spartan Newsroom.

UPCOMING #3 FOR EDITORS: On Friday, May  4, CNS will move its end-of-semester Bonus Week budget. These are still-timely stories you may not have had space for when they were first reported.

Here’s your file:

UPDEER: Heavy snows this winter are bad news for the U.P.’s deer population. It’s harder than usual for them to move around and to find nutritious browse, according to the DNR. Adverse effects include death and lower reproduction rates. We also talk to the MUCC vice president who is a trustee for the U.P. Whitetails Association. By Kaley Fech. FOR SAULT STE. MARIE, ST. IGNACE, MARQUETTE, BAY MILLS, CHEBOYGAN AND ALL POINTS.

ADULTEDUCATION: Despite Michigan’s low high school graduation rate, funding of adult education programs remains far lower than needed. Some U.P. residents must drive 50 miles to the closest program. We hear from the Michigan Workforce Development Agency, Northwest Michigan Works! and the Michigan League for Public Policy. By Casey Hull. FOR GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, TRAVERSE CITY, LEELANAU, PETOSKEY, HARBOR SPRINGS, BIG RAPIDS, MANISTEE, CADILLAC, MARQUETTE, SAULT STE. MARIE, BAY MILLS AND ALL POINTS.

SCHOOLCOUNSELORS: School shootings and other traumatic events highlight a growing workload for public school counselors, with too few therapists amid rising concern about violent incidents and threats in school. Petoskey and Traverse City school experts and the MEA talk about it. By Casey Hull. FOR TRAVERSE CITY, LANSING CITY PULSE, PETOSKEY AND ALL POINTS.

ROADPAYOUTS: Did a pothole just eat your tire and rim? Want compensation? Fuhgeddaboutit. Like the state, counties rarely reimburse motorists for pothole damage to their vehicles. Road officials in Gladwin and Montmorency explain why. The MDOT director says more money for road maintenance would reduce the problem. By Maxwell Evans. FOR MONTMORENCY, GLADWIN AND ALL POINTS.

PEOPLEMOVING: Some rural areas are seeing more folks move in than out. Isabella, Wayne, Missaukee and Grand Traverse are among the counties that lost more residents than they gained while Crawford, Lake, Antrim and Leelanau showed net migration gains. We talk to the Crawford County economic development coordinator, a Mancelona legislator and experts from Northern Michigan University and Grand Valley State University. By Crystal Chen. FOR CRAWFORD COUNTY, TRAVERSE CITY, LEELANAU, BIG RAPIDS, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, LAKE COUNTY AND ALL POINTS.

DISABILITIES: Facilities employing and training people with disabilities face increased regulations that could cut the amount of help they can provide. The dispute focuses on the state’s interpretation of a federal law intended to get more people with disabilities into the general workforce. We talk to program officials in Traverse City and Alpena and to the Michigan Association of Rehabilitation Organizations. By Casey Hull. FOR TRAVERSE CITY, LEELANAU, ALCONA, MONTMORENCY, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS AND ALL POINTS.

BREED: Lions and tigers and bears, oh regulate! A Lowell lawmaker wants the state to regulate the breeding of large carnivores by zoos in Michigan, saying it would promote animal safety, health and conservation. The zoo in Grand Rapids likes the idea but the Detroit Zoo doesn’t.We also talk to the Department of Agriculture and Rural Development and to the DNR. By Crystal Chen. FOR IONIA, GREENVILLE, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS AND ALL POINTS.

PROJECTS: A pilot program looking for better ways to coordinate repair, maintenance and replacement of Michigan’s roads and other infrastructure is finishing its recommendations this month. The pilot program includes 13 West Michigan counties, including Ionia, Lake, Mecosta, Mason, Oceana, Montcalm, Ottawa, Kent, Allegan, as well as Metro Detroit. We hear from Lt. Gov. Calley and a Snyder advisor. A lawmaker from Walker has introduced related legislation. By Riley Murdock. FOR IONIA, GREENVILLE, LUDINGTON, HOLLAND, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, OCEANA, LAKE COUNTY, BIG RAPIDS AND ALL POINTS.

SCHOOLHOMELESSNESS: Michigan schoolchildren and youths are struggling with homelessness at some of the highest rates in the nation, new studies from U-M and the Michigan League for Public Policy show. The top five counties for child wellbeing are Livingston, Ottawa, Clinton and Oakland. The bottom five are Lake, Clare, Muskegon, Calhoun and Oceana. A Ludington-based nonprofit agency that works with homeless youth tells us more. By Gloria Nzeka. FOR LUDINGTON, MANISTEE, OCEANA, LAKE COUNTY, HOLLAND, CLARE COUNTY, LANSING CITY PULSE AND ALL POINTS.

TESTSCORES: Michigan continues to fare poorly on a national education assessment test for fourth- and eighth-graders. We talk to the Education Department and a Wayne State education expert. By Colton Wood. FOR ALL POINTS.

JAILDIVERSION: Lt. Gov. Calley says the state should do more to provide treatment rather than jail for criminal suspects with mental health and substance abuse programs. We hear about pilot programs in Barry County and Kalamazoo that involve mental health agencies, judges, sheriffs and prosecutors. By Colton Wood. FOR ALL POINTS.

CRIMINALJUSTICE: Although the state’s prison population has plunged, criminal justice experts say more can be done to reduce the number of inmates. There’s legislation sponsored by representatives from Williamsbug and Grand Rapids, among other places. The Citizens Alliance on Prisons and Public Spending and Lt. Gov. Calley discuss. By Gloria Nzeka. FOR IONIA, SAULT STE. MARIE, MARQUETTE, GREENVILLE, LANSING CITY LIMITS, BAY MILLS, TRAVERSE CITY AND  ALL POINTS.

BOATINGSAFETY: Are Michigan waters getting less safe for boating, with or without motors? The number of recreational boating accidents on inland waters and the Great Lakes increased from 92 in 2013 to 125 in 2016, and the deaths rose from 21 in 2012 to 38 in 2016, according to the Coast Guard. One factor is the sharply rising interest in paddle sports. We talk to the Crawford County Sheriff’s Office, the head of the state Waterways Commission, from Grand Haven, and a Hudsonville-based powerboat club. By Agnes Bao. FOR CRAWFORD COUNTY, HOLLAND, LUDINGTON, MANISTEE, OCEANA, TRAVERSE CITY, PETOSKEY, LEELANAU, CHEBOYGAN, CADILLAC, BIG RAPIDS, GLADWIN, GREENVILLE, ALCONA, MONTMORENCY, MARQUETTE, SAULT STE. MARIE, CLARE, HARBOR SPRINGS, STURGIS, THREE RIVERS, LAKE COUNTY, HERALD-REVIEW, BENZIE  AND ALL POINTS.

AVIANMALARIA: Researchers from Western Michigan University have found a surprisingly large number of blood parasites that infect Southwest Michigan songbirds with sometimes-deadly avian malaria. Climate change could worsen the problem, according to the scientists who tested 726 songbirds from dozens of bird species in 12 counties. By Eric Freedman. FOR STURGIS, THREE RIVERS, HOLLAND AND ALL POINTS.


FEMMEMUSIC: Female and gender non-conforming artists might not get the recognition they deserve, but passionate local and statewide female and gender nonconforming artists are pushing boundaries, including the organization Girls Rock Detroit, the Metro Detroit band Zilch and Lansing singer V.Soul. For news and entertainment/features sections. By Terri Powys. FOR LANSING CITY PULSE AND ALL POINTS.

w/FEMMEMUSICPHOTO: Girls Rock Detroit founders Melissa Coppola, Rosalind Hartigan and Willa Rae. Credit: Rosalind Hartigan

CORMORANTS: It’s legal again to kill cormorants after a year-long hiatus during a  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service study. Colonies are found in places like Beaver Island, Ludington, Saginaw Bay and the Les Cheneaux Islands, causing habitat devastation and pushing out other bird species in some places. Critics claim the birds hurt local fisheries, but researchers say their impact on local fishing is exaggerated. The Fish and Wildlife Service and a researcher explain. By Steven Maier. FOR SAULT STE. MARIE, MARQUETTE, BAY MILLS, CHEBOYGAN, ST. IGNACE, ALCONA, TRAVERSE CITY, LEELANAU, LUDINGTON, MANISTEE, OCEANA, PETOSKEY, HARBOR SPRINGS, BENZIE AND ALL POINTS.

w/CORMORANTSPHOTO: Cormorants on this island in the St. Mary’s River in the Eastern U.P. have degraded its vegetation. Credit: Francie Cuthbert.

LIFEAFTERSPORTS: How do college athletes who don’t make it to the pros cope with the transition? Few ever play professionally: only 5.6 percent of men’s ice hockey players join the NHL, only 1.5 percent of football players will play in the NFL and fewer than 1 percent of female basketball athletes will play in the WNBA. We talk to a former MSU club football and track and field player from Newport who now works in IT, a former U-M All American swimmer who now helps athletes transition and a former MSU rugby player from Oxford who now works at a ski resort. For sports and news sections. By Trevor Darnell. FOR ALL POINTS.  

CNS

CNS Budget – April 13, 2018

April 13, 2018 – Week 12

To: CNS Editors

From: Dave Poulson & Sheila Schimpf

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Tony Cepak at (517) 803-6841; cepak@msu.edu.

For other matters, contact CNS Director Eric Freedman at (517) 355-4729 or (517) 256-3873; freedma5@msu.edu.

 

Here’s your file:

TARTCHERRIES: Michigan is the country’s top producer of tart cherries but the industry is slammed by a sharp increase in lower-cost imports. A grower in Oceana County, the Farm Bureau and the Cherry Marketing Institute weigh in. By Kaley Fech. FOR LEELANAU, OCEANA, TRAVERSE CITY, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, PETOSKEY, BENZIE, MANISTEE, CADILLAC AND ALL POINTS.

BIKESHARE: Bike sharing is growing in popularity across the country, prompting Michigan communities to also look hard at creating such programs. Holland is considering a bike-sharing program and Grand Rapids is studying the feasibility of one. Detroit, Ann Arbor and Port Huron already have them. We also hear from the Michigan League of Bicyclists. By Crystal Chen. FOR HOLLAND, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS AND ALL POINTS.

CITIZENSHIPQUESTION: Michigan’s share of federal funds and the size of its congressional delegation could be harmed if the next U.S. Census asks a controversial question about citizenship, critics say. We talk to the Michigan League for Public Policy and the Michigan Immigrant Rights Center. By Riley Murdock. FOR LANSING CITY PULSE AND ALL POINTS

TOURISM: Michigan tourism had an excellent 2017, and local travel and tourism bureaus are aiming for even higher revenues for 2018. Mason and Allegan counties and the Petoskey area are among the areas that did really well. By Gloria Nzeka. FOR HOLLAND, LUDINGTON, MANISTEE, PETOSKEY, HARBOR SPRINGS, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS AND ALL POINTS.

CHILDCARE: President Trump has proposed increasing federal subsidies for child care for low-income parents to the tune of $70 million a year for Michigan. Child care advocates welcome the proposal but say the cost of care will still remain out of reach for many families, creating an educational disadvantage for children and an obstacle for parents who want to work. We hear from a Petoskey day care center owner and the Michigan League for Human Services. By Maxwell Evans. FOR PETOSKEY, HARBOR SPRINGS, LANSING CITY PULSE AND ALL POINTS.

AVALANCHE: Dead isn’t always dead. A new study recounts the near-miraculous survival of a 12-year-old U.P. skier who was buried head-down and unconscious in an avalanche for at least three hours. Avalanches are rare but not unknown in Michigan. The 1939 incident in Bessemer offers an important lesson for rescuers today: “Don’t give up until the victim is warm and dead or warm and alive.” Fatalities have occurred in Negaunee and Sleeping Bear Dunes. By Eric Freedman. FOR MARQUETTE, BAY MILLS, SAULT STE. MARIE, LEELANAU, TRAVERSE CITY, CHEBOYGAN AND ALL POINTS.  

PBBCONTAMINATION: PBB contamination still plagues the Gratiot County community of St. Louis decades after the closure of the chemical plant that caused it. Community activists persevere in their quest for finishing the cleanup and for addressing the health problems that some residents face. By Jack Nissen. FOR ALL POINTS.

w/PBBCONTAMINATIONPHOTO: Jane Keon. Credit: Jack Nissan

w/PBBCONTAMINATIONCOVER: Jane Keon’s book, “Tombstone Town,” chronicles an activist group working to clean a small mid-Michigan town.

w/PBBCONTAMINATIONPHOTO2: St. Louis, Michigan, became the site of persistent chemical contamination long after the producer of chemicals like PBB and DDT had left. Credit: City of St. Louis.

MUSICSTRAINS: You’ve got to be tough to play music. Stress as diverse as tendinitis, carpal tunnel syndrome and anxiety from being forced to stop doing what you love all take a toll on musicians, regardless of genre. We hear about the problem from musicians and other experts from Central Michigan University, MSU and Flint. For news and entertainment/features sections. By Khal Malik. FOR LANSING CITY PULSE AND ALL POINTS.

CNS

CNS Budget – April 6, 2018

April 6, 2018 – Week 11

To: CNS Editors

From: Eric Freedman & Sheila Schimpf

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Tony Cepak at (517) 803-6841; cepak@msu.edu.

For other matters, contact CNS Director Eric Freedman at (517) 355-4729 or (517) 256-3873; freedma5@msu.edu.

 

Here’s your file:

NATIVEHISTORY: Officials are taking a hard look at state historical markers that are offensive or inaccurate about Native Americans and ignore their contributions to Michigan and the Great Lakes region. One marker has been removed on Mackinac Island, where the state is converting a historic fur trader’s house to a Native American museum. Kalamazoo is removing a controversial statue showing settlers conquering native peoples. We talk to the Michigan Historic Center, Mackinac State Historic Parks and the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians. By Maxwell Evans. FOR ST. IGNACE, BAY MILLS, CHEBOYGAN, SAULT STE. MARIE, PETOSKEY, HARBOR SPRINGS, TRAVERSE CITY AND ALL POINTS.

w/NATIVEHISTORYPHOTO: Historic Biddle House on Mackinac Island was once a fur trader’s home and will become a Native American history museum. Credit: Creative Commons.

BODYCAMS: Michigan’s body cam privacy law took effect this year. Law enforcement officers are divided on their desirability and usefulness, citing questions about cost, privacy and effectiveness. Sheriff and police departments weigh in, including Montcalm County, Macomb County, Howell and Grand Valley State University. By Crystal Chen. FOR GREENVILLE, IONIA,  LANSING CITY PULSE AND ALL POINTS.

RURALBIKING: Bicycle safety in rural areas is of great concern. One approach is increasing the use of trails for non-motorized vehicles, such as the White Pine Trail between Comstock Park and Cadillac, and the Kal-Haven Trail between Kalamazoo and South Haven. Some communities have bike-friendly “complete street” plans, including Manistique, Sault Ste. Marie and Lansing. We talk to the DNR, League of Michigan Bicyclists, Pere Marquette Snowmobile Club in Evart. By Maxwell Evans. FOR CADILLAC, BIG RAPIDS, GREENVILLE, HERALD-REVIEW, HOLLAND, SAULT STE. MARIE, MARQUETTE, LANSING CITY PULSE AND ALL POINTS.

FOSTERPARENTS: There’s a strong need for foster parents in Michigan where five out of every 1,000 children are in foster care, a tough but rewarding task. We talk to two nonprofit groups that promote foster parenting and to the Department of Health and Human Services. By Crystal Chen. FOR ALL POINTS.

TELEHEALTH: Telehealth services were promoted as a less expensive and faster way to get health care to residents of rural areas, but there are concerns by doctors and patients. We talk to a health care service in Marquette, the medical officer in District 10, which covers much of the northern Lower Peninsula, and the Michigan State Medical Society. By Agnes Bao. FOR MARQUETTE, LUDINGTON, CRAWFORD COUNTY, MANISTEE, LAKE COUNTY, CADILLAC, BIG RAPIDS, OCEANA, BAY MILLS. SAULT STE. MARIE, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS AND ALL POINTS.

TEENSUICIDES: Suicide rates among teenagers nationally are at a 40-year high, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, with the rate among girls rising faster than among boys. Nobody knows the precise reasons. We talk to anti-suicide activists from Grand Haven and Muskegon County. By Gloria Nzeka. FOR HOLLAND, OCEANA, LANSING CITY PULSE AND ALL POINTS.

RENEWABLENERGY: DTE Energy’s new plan submitted to the Public Service Commission promises to double its use of renewable energy by 2021, but critics say the utility’s plan doesn’t go far enough. They also question the need to build a new natural gas-fired plant in St. Clair County. The company provides electricity in Southeast Michigan and natural gas in much of the state. We talk to DTE Energy, Great Lakes Renewable Energy Association and Michigan Environmental Council. By Kaley Fech. FOR GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, HOLLAND, LUDINGTON, OCEANA, MANISTEE, TRAVERSE CITY, PETOSKEY, MONTMORENCY, ALCONA, CLARE, GLADWIN, CRAWFORD COUNTY, CHEBOYGAN, MARQUETTE, BIG RAPIDS, CADILLAC, BENZIE, HERALD-STAR AND ALL POINTS.

HEPATITIS: Vaccination efforts by local health departments and the state have helped reduce the hepatitis A outbreak that started in 2016, infected 797 people in 32 counties and caused 25 deaths. The Department of Health and Human Services tells how it and local health departments (District 4, Benzie-Leelanau, Northwest Michigan) have battled the disease, apparently ending the outbreak. By Casey Hull. FOR TRAVERSE CITY, LEELANAU, MONTMORENCY, BENZIE, CHEBOYGAN, PETOSKEY, HARBOR SPRINGS, LANSING CITY PULSE AND ALL POINTS.

VEHICLEMISSIONS: The EPA is considering lower emission standards for new vehicles. Environmentalists say that would be a step backward. A poll last year found that more than seven out of 10 Michiganders favor the current vehicle emission standard, with only 21 percent supporting a lower standard..We hear from the Michigan Automobile Dealers Association, Michigan Environmental Council and the Center for Automotive Research in Ann Arbor. By Agnes Bao. FOR GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS AND ALL POINTS.

LABORSHORTAGE: A shortage of skilled workers has left manufacturers struggling to fill openings. Baker College in Cadillac has a program to help fill the skills gap, as do Henry Ford College and Oakland Community College. The Michigan Manufacturers Association discusses the problems. By Riley Murdock. FOR CADILLAC, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS AND ALL POINTS.

w/LABORSHORTAGEPHOTO1: Baker College of Cadillac’s Center for Advanced Manufacturing Innovation. Credit: Mark Lagerwey.

w/LABORSHORTAGEPHOTO2: Baker College of Cadillac’s Center for Advanced Manufacturing Innovation. Credit: Mark Lagerwey.

ADDICTIONTREATMENT: New research and a recently announced federal investigation may lead to more states using addiction treatment medications such as methadone for prisoners struggling with substance abuse behind bars. We hear from the Saginaw County Sheriff’s Department, a Muskegon Correctional Facility sergeant and an ex-addict from Ottawa County. By Colton Wood. FOR HOLLAND, IONIA, GREENVILLE, MARQUETTE, BAY MILLS, LANSING CITY PULSE AND ALL POINTS.

OPIOIDS: Tougher rules on opioid prescriptions may make it tougher for hospice services to provide pain medication for dying patients. We hear from Hospice of Michigan. Lawmakers from from Manton, Clare and Bainbridge have a proposal to address that problem. By Riley Murdock. FOR CADILLAC, CLARE, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, LANSING CITY PULSE AND ALL POINTS.

SEXEDUCATION: Amid widespread attention to sexual assault, schools would be required to revamp how they teach about affirmative consent in sex ed classes under a proposal by a Mason lawmaker, with a Calumet cosponsor. We also hear from an Ingham County senator, the Michigan Coalition to End Domestic and Sexual Violence based in Okemos and the MEA. By Colton Wood. FOR LANSING CITY PULSE, MARQUETTE AND ALL POINTS.

POLICEDIVERSITY: Law enforcement agencies are struggling to recruit a more diverse pool of officers and deputies. Reasons include public perceptions of law enforcement officers, the cost of training and lack of information about careers. We hear about the Holland Police Department’s efforts and talk to the Howell police chief, the Oakland Police Academy and Michigan Association of Chiefs of Police. By Gloria Nzeka. FOR HOLLAND, LANSING CITY PULSE AND ALL POINTS.

CNS

CNS Budget – March 30, 2018

March 30, 2018 – Week 10

To: CNS Editors

From: Sheila Schimpf & Perry Parks

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Tony Cepak at (517) 803-6841; cepak@msu.edu.

For other matters, contact CNS Director Eric Freedman at (517) 355-4729 or (517) 256-3873; freedma5@msu.edu.

Here’s your file:

RURALGRANTS: New grants for rural projects are going to Marquette, Ludington, Escanaba, Elk Rapids, Negaunee, White Pine, L’Anse, Newberry, Pentwater and the Michigan Blueberry Commission in Fennville. This story looks at how grants awarded last year are being used by the Marquette Watershed Partnership and two local business in Grand Traverse. By Riley Murdock. FOR LUDINGTON, MANISTEE, MARQUETTE, SAULT STE. MARIE, PETOSKEY, TRAVERSE CITY, BAY MILLS, OCEANA, HOLLAND, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS  AND ALL POINTS.

w/RURALGRANTSPHOTO: Members of the Great Lakes Conservation Corps (GLCC) have assisted Upper Peninsula communities with a wide variety of nature tourism projects thanks to grant support from the Michigan Department of Agriculture (MDA).  Credit: The GLCC is a program of the Superior Watershed Partnership (SWP).

DOGSINCOURT: New legislation proposed by a Potterville representative would allow a trained  “courtroom support dog” to accompany witnesses when they testify. Leelanau and Calhoun counties already use dogs in victims-witness program. We speak with advocates about advantages and challenges. By Colton Wood. FOR LEELANAU, TRAVERSE CITY, LANSING CITY PULSE AND ALL POINTS.

ROADFUNDING: Road construction funding is the elephant in the room no one wants to talk about in an election year, despite a poll that shows it is the first concern of voters. All measures right now are simple band-aids for a runaway problem, according to recent transportation reports. Candidates for state office this year appear to be barely addressing the road issue. By Riley Murdock. FOR ALL POINTS.

STEMDIVERSITY: There is a nationwide push to recruit more women for jobs involving science, technology, engineering and math. But it’s tough to achieve change. We look at efforts around Michigan to overcome barriers such as peer pressure and lack of exposure to role models. By Agnes Bao. FOR GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, LANSING CITY PULSE AND ALL POINTS.

SELFDRIVINGCARS. How can a state that can’t patch potholes make roads smart enough for self-driving cars? Experts and the state’s transportation director discuss what it will take to prepare infrastructure for a human-driverless future. By Gloria Nzeka. FOR ALL POINTS.

REVENUESHARING: Cuts to local police typically get all the attention when cities and counties complain that the state doesn’t send them enough money. But what about impacts to parks and other less high profile programs? Benton Harbor is one city that took a hit. We look at services that local governments are whittling down as a result of the miserly revenue sharing practices of the Legislature. By Maxwell Evans. FOR THREE RIVERS, STURGIS, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS AND ALL POINTS.

LIBRARYUSE: As Internet technology use expands in everyday life and education, libraries’ free internet access has become an increasingly valuable service – especially in rural areas where access is limited. We talk to libraries in Presque Isle, Grand Traverse County and Alpena about their services. By Casey Hull. FOR CHEBOYGAN, MONTMORENCY, ALCONA, TRAVERSE CITY, CRAWFORD, HARBOR SPRINGS, PETOSKEY AND ALL POINTS

SEX&MERCURY: Sex hormones might be the secret for lowering mercury levels in fish and maybe humans, say researchers at Grand Valley’s Robert B. Annis Water Resources Institute in Muskegon and the Great Lakes Science Center. States often issue consumption limits in areas with high concentrations of mercury in fish, which can cause illness and are especially harmful to unborn children. Researchers now believe that male fish are able to shed mercury, thanks to their testosterone. By Stephen Maier. FOR LUDINGTON, MANISTEE, HOLLAND, TRAVERSE CITY, OCEANA, PETOSKEY, HARBOR SPRINGS, CHEBOYGAN, ALCONA, ST. IGNACE, SAULT STE. MARIE, MARQUETTE, BAY MILLS AND ALL POINTS.

w/SEX&MERCURYPHOTO: Sea lamprey provided a clue for researchers searching for the secret behind male fish’s ability to expel mercury from their bodies. Image: Joanna Gilkeson, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.

ENVIRONMENTALLAWS: A Port Huron angler once told Ethan Shirley that a fisherman’s job is to break the law as much as possible without getting caught. That’s a challenging attitude to overcome when enforcing environmental laws. MSU researchers say involving local residents in explaining and understanding conservation laws earns compliance better than simple enforcement. By Lauren Caramagno. FOR ALL POINTS.

CNS

CNS Budget – March 23, 2018

March 23, 2018 – Week 9

To: CNS Editors

From: Sheila Schimpf & Perry Parks

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Tony Cepak at (517) 803-6841; cepak@msu.edu.

For other matters, contact CNS Director Eric Freedman at (517) 355-4729 or (517) 256-3873; freedma5@msu.edu.

 

REMINDER: MICHIGAN JOURNALISM HALL OF FAME: The Hall of Fame will induct four members on Sunday, April 15: Susan Ager, formerly of the Detroit Free Press; John McElroy of “Autoline This Week” and WWJ Radio; Jerome Vaughn of WDET; and Jim Wojcik of the Central Michigan University Department of Journalism. For details and registration for the dinner at MSU’s Kellogg Center, go to http://j-school.jrn.msu.edu/halloffame/. For questions, contact Kareen Lubas at lubaskar@msu.edu.

Here’s your file:

 

COLLEGEASSAULT: Some state university campuses, including Western, Central, Grand Valley and Eastern, have revised their Title IX procedures and programs to address problems with unreported and underreported sexual assaults and a “rape culture” on campuses. Campus officials explain what they’ve done to better protect students and comply with federal law. By Casey Hull. FOR GREENVILLE, HOLLAND, IONIA, STURGIS, THREE RIVERS, LANSING CITY PULSE, BLISSFIELD, AND ALL POINTS.

 

CLIMATEPOTHOLES: What connects climate change and lots of precipitation with Michigan’s proliferating potholes? Last year set a precipitation record. There’s a clear long-term trend towards milder winters long-term in Michigan while the number of freeze-thaw cycles has been down. that’s that has been unmistakable for the last three to four decades. The state climatologist, MDOT and a climate and space sciences specialist at the University of Michigan explain. By Riley Murdock. FOR ALL POINTS.

 

Can be paired with…

 

COUNTYROADS: Because of the large amount of rainfall and return to freezing temperatures in the past month, many county road departments are spending much of their budget that would usually be reserved for longer-lasting repairs to roads and bridges during the summer. We hear from the road commissions in Emmet County, St. Joseph County and Clare County and the County Road Association of Michigan. By Casey Hull. FOR HARBOR SPRINGS, PETOSKEY, STURGIS, THREE RIVERS, CLARE AND ALL POINTS.

 

UNSAFEBRIDGES: The collapse of a new pedestrian bridge in Florida and a recent critical report about the condition of Michigan’s bridges have increased public attention to bridge safety. Local and state reconstruction projects are underway, including one in Mecosta County, but there’s not enough money to do all the necessary bridge maintenance and repairs. We talk to MDOT, a civil engineering professor at Western Michigan University and the Michigan chapter of  the American Society of Civil Engineers. By Agnes Bao. FOR BIG RAPIDS, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS JOURNAL AND ALL POINTS.

 

ROADMAINTENANCE: As the state’s roads and bridges continue to deteriorate, what’s happening with MDOT and counties contracting out with private companies for road maintenance services? We talk to MDOT, a legislator from Mancelona, the union representing MDOT road workers and road commissions in Montcalm, Allegan and Barry counties. By Crystal Chen. FOR GREENVILLE, HOLLAND, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, TRAVERSE CITY, PETOSKEY AND ALL POINTS.

 

CYBERSECURITY: In the aftermath of an Auditor General’s report finding that a fifth of selected state workers clicked on phishing scam links, there’s now more attention on possible similar cybersecurity weaknesses at local government agencies across the state. We talk to a Grand Valley expert, the Auditor General’s office and officials in Lake and Gladwin counties. By Maxwell Evans. FOR GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, GREENVILLE, IONIA, LAKE COUNTY, GLADWIN, LUDINGTON, CADILLAC, MANISTEE AND ALL POINTS.

 

LATEXGLOVES: A Traverse City lawmaker wants to require restaurants whose workers use latex gloves to post warning signs for their customers. The Department of Agriculture and Rural Development says an increasing number of consumers appear to be latex-sensitive. We also talk to the Michigan Association for Local Public Health. By Gloria Nzeka. FOR TRAVERSE CITY, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS AND ALL POINTS.

 

WEAPONS: Legislators from Sturgis, Wayland and Charlotte say a law banning some weapons — blackjacks, “slungshots,” billies, metal knuckles, “sand clubs” and “sand bags” — is outdated and should be eliminated as part of an overhaul of the state’s criminal justice laws. Many people are unsure of what some of those weapons are. The Ludington police chief says he worries about public safety. A Muskegon police captain says he has mixed feelings because of the right to bear arms and the need to protect police officers and the public. By Bailey Laske. FOR STURGIS, THREE RIVERS, LUDINGTON, HOLLAND, LANSING CITY PULSE AND ALL POINTS.

 

RECIDIVISM: The state’s recidivism rate — the proportion of ex-cons who return to prison for new crimes — has dropped to its lowest-ever level, the Corrections Department says. We hear from Change for Life, a Detroit nonprofit that works with prisoners and Jackson College. Western Michigan University also teaches courses to inmates. By Bailey Laske. FOR IONIA, MARQUETTE, GREENVILLE, SAULT STE. MARIE, OCEANA, HOLLAND, BAY MILLS AND ALL POINTS.

 

CNS

CNS BUDGET – March 16, 2018

March 16, 2018 – Week 8

To: CNS Editors

From: Eric Freedman & Sheila Schimpf

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Tony Cepak at (517) 803-6841; cepak@msu.edu.

For other matters, contact CNS Director Eric Freedman at (517) 355-4729 or (517) 256-3873; freedma5@msu.edu.

Here’s your file:

DRINKINGWATER: When it comes to water, the contaminants you drink depend on where you live. Lead gets the most headlines but there are problems with arsenic, nitrate and volatile organic compounds. According to DEQ data, generally the further north you go, the safer your water is, although when it comes to nitrates, west is worse than east. The story names these counties, among others, on the naughty or nice lists: Mason, St. Joseph, Marquette, Montmorency, Mackinac, Manistee, Luce, Baraga, Keweenaw, Oceana, Alpena, Cass, Montcalm and Branch.  By Bailey Laske. FOR STURGIS, THREE RIVERS, MARQUETTE, MONTMORENCY, LUDINGTON, ST. IGNACE, MANISTEE, SAULT STE. MARIE, BAY MILLS, OCEANA AND ALL POINTS.

 

SEEDPOTATO: It may become mandatory for most potato seed growers to use only certified seed to prevent the spread of diseases that can threaten a valuable part of the state’s agricultural economy, under a bill awaiting the governor’s signature. We hear from the lead sponsor from Hudsonville, as well as a grower in Elmira, the Michigan Potato Industry Council and MSU. Major growing counties include Montcalm, Mecosta, Antrim, St. Joseph and Delta. There are co-sponsors from Cedar Lake, Berrien Springs, Sherman Township, Mancelona and Grand Rapids. For agriculture and news sections. By Crystal Chen. FOR HOLLAND, BIG RAPIDS, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, THREE RIVERS, STURGIS, GREENVILLE, MARQUETTE, MONTMORENCY, PETOSKEY, SAULT STE. MARIE AND ALL POINTS.

FARMERFEARS: Many farmers are worried about possible retaliatory trade tariffs for agricultural products that Michigan exports to China and elsewhere. We talk to soybean, milk and agri-business groups about the potential impacts. For agriculture and news sections. By Kaley Fech. FOR GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS AND ALL POINTS.

 

LAUGHINGGAS: A proposal moving through the Legislature would set an 18-year-old age minimum to buy nitrous oxide — laughing gas — in Michigan. The goal is to make it more difficult for young people to get high. But even if the bill passes, young people could still get nitrous oxide legally. Sponsors include Calumet and Mattawan legislators. We talk to a substance abuse recovery expert from Brighton, the Michigan State Medical Society and the Department of Health and Human Services. By Bailey Laske. FOR SAULT STE. MARIE, BAY MILLS, HOLLAND, STURGIS, THREE RIVERS, LANSING CITY PULSE AND ALL POINTS.

 

HOMELESSSTUDENTS: Homeless college students are often reluctant to seek assistance. Wayne State University has a program to help. Eastern Michigan University and Washtenaw Community College are partnering with an Ypsilanti nonprofit to provide mental health services. We also hear from the Michigan Community College Association. By Agnes Bao. FOR LANSING CITY PULSE, BIG RAPIDS, HOLLAND, GREENVILLE, MARQUETTE, SAULT STE. MARIE AND ALL POINTS.

 

ASSISTANCEFORMS: The Department of Health and Human Services has worked with a nonprofit Detroit design firm to slash the number of pages in the applications for social services benefits from 42 to 18 in an effort to simplify the process for the public and state staff. It was the longest application of its kind in the country. A plain English expert from Western Michigan University’s Thomas M. Cooley Law School says other departments should follow suit. By Maxwell Evans. FOR GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, LANSING CITY PULSE AND ALL POINTS.

 

GENDERPAYGAP: In what critics call another move to curb the power of local governments, some lawmakers want to prohibit communities from passing ordinances that block employers from asking job applicants about their past earnings. Proponents for equal pay for women object. By Gloria Nzeka. FOR GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS AND ALL POINTS.

 

TIPPINGFEES: The governor has proposed dramatically increase dumping fees — tipping fees — to raise money for recycling, among other environmental programs. Michigan lags nationally in its recycling rate, and more state grants could spur an improvement. We hear about the program in Emmet County, which has one of the state’s highest rates and also serves Cheboygan, Otsego and Presque Isle counties. DEQ and the Michigan Recycling Coalition tell us more. By Casey Hull. FOR PETOSKEY, CHEBOYGAN AND ALL POINTS.

CNS

 

CNS Budget – March 1, 2018

March 1, 2018 – Week 7

To: CNS Editors

From: Eric Freedman & Sheila Schimpf

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Tony Cepak at (517) 803-6841; cepak@msu.edu.

For other matters, contact CNS Director Eric Freedman at (517) 355-4729 or (517) 256-3873; freedma5@msu.edu.

REMINDER TO EDITORS: Because of the MSU spring break, CNS won’t file stories on Friday, March 9. We resume our regular schedule on Friday, March 16,

Here’s your file:

PRISONCLOSING: What happens to a small community when the state closes a prison that’s been a major employer? With the Corrections Department planning to shut the cell doors at Shoreline Correctional Facility in Muskegon, we visit Coldwater to see what’s happened since Florence Crane Correctional Facility closed in 2011. Not much going on downtown. By Gloria Nzeka. FOR LUDINGTON, MANISTEE, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, HOLLAND, OCEANA, STURGIS, THREE RIVERS AND ALL POINTS.

w/PRISONSCLOSINGPHOTO1: The closing of a local prison has hit downtown Coldwater hard. Credit: Gloria Nzeka

w/PRISONCLOSINGPHOTO2: Retailers get hit when an area prison closes. Credit: Gloria Nzeka

TRAFFICSTOP: New legislation is intended to smooth interactions between law enforcement officers and drivers during traffic stops. Amid concerns over racial profiling, it comes after a State Police analysis shows that the race of drivers stopped in 2017 was in the same proportion as they are in the state’s population. We talk to the Crawford County undersheriff, Howell police chief, Lansing ACLU and the Office of Highway Safety Planning. Sponsors include lawmakers from Battle Creek, Hart, Portage and Lowell. By Agnes Bao. CRAWFORD COUNTY, OCEANA, IONIA, LANSING CITY PULSE AND ALL POINTS.

w/TRAFFICSTOPTABLE: The races of drivers stopped by State Police in 2017 in Michigan. Source: State Police  

TEACHEREDUCATION: Lawmakers have been struggling for years to improve teacher education. A House committee is mulling over legislation that would, among other things, create a Master Teacher Program to mentor new teachers and require colleges and universities to provide a 2-year “warranty” that provides additional classes for their graduates who don’t perform well on teaching assessments. We hear from Holland and Saginaw representatives and a Spring Arbor teacher who testified before the committee. By Casey Hull. FOR HOLLAND AND ALL POINTS.

AIREMISSIONS: A federal court ruling means many livestock farms will no longer be exempt from reporting air emissions from their animals and manure. An Ottawa County beef farmer says the change means more paperwork that could drive up the price of food. The Farm Bureau says the reporting wouldn’t provide any benefits. The Michigan Environmental Council says it’s important to monitor emissions for air quality. For news and agriculture pages. By Crystal Chen.

FOR HOLLAND AND ALL POINTS.

TRAINTRESPASSING: Dramatic crashes between cars and trains draw public attention but take fewer lives than train-”trespasser”incidents, a new federal study shows. Last year 13 died and six were injured in Michigan. Many of the trespassers walked along the tracks wearing earbuds and don’t detect the danger. We talk to MDOT and Michigan Operation Lifesaver. By Riley Murdock. FOR STURGIS, THREE RIVERS AND ALL POINTS.

 

POLICERECRUITMENT: Police departments around the state are having problems recruiting officers. Reasons include a diminution of benefits, including retirement benefits, the cost of training and public attitudes toward law enforcement officers. We hear from police officials in Cadillac and Howell and from the Michigan Association of Chiefs of Police. By Riley Murdock. FOR CADILLAC & ALL POINTS.

ROADFUNDING: The Legislature has been moving on the $175 million in road maintenance funding requested by the governor. Much of the money would go to county and municipal roads. Cadillac could use some of it to upgrade major roads. Meanwhile, a construction industry trade group that represents road and bridge contractors says Isabella County wants to improperly use state money for a new headquarters rather than for road projects. By Maxwell Evans. FOR CADILLAC, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS AND ALL POINTS.

TRACKSMAGAZINE: “Tracks,” the Michigan United Conservation Clubs’ magazine for children, is marking its 40th anniversary this year. By Jacqueline Kelly. FOR ALL POINTS.

w/TRACKSMAGAZINECOVER: Credit: Michigan United Conservation Clubs

RIVERTRAILS: The National Park Service is considering requests to designate national river trails for the recently reviled Flint River and the Shiawassee River. One goal is to attract more visitors to the rivers and their communities. By Lizzy LaFavre. FOR ALL POINTS.

w/RIVERTRAILSPHOTO: Kayaking on the Shiawassee River.. Credit: Oakland County

CNS

CNS Budget – Feb. 23, 2018

Feb. 23, 2018 – Week 6

To: CNS Editors

From: Eric Freedman & Sheila Schimpf

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Tony Cepak at (517) 803-6841; cepak@msu.edu.

For other matters, contact CNS Director Eric Freedman at (517) 355-4729 or (517) 256-3873; freedma5@msu.edu.

 

EARLY FILE NEXT WEEK: We’ll file Thursday, March 1, instead of Friday because of MSU’s spring break. There will not be a file on Friday, March 9. We resume our regular schedule on Friday, March 16.

 

MICHIGAN JOURNALISM HALL OF FAME: The Hall of Fame will induct four members on Sunday, April 15. Susan Ager, formerly of the Detroit Free Press; John McElroy of “Autoline This Week” and WWJ Radio; Jerome Vaughn of WDET; and Jim Wojcik of the Central Michigan University Department of Journalism. For details and registration, go to http://j-school.jrn.msu.edu/halloffame/. For questions, contact Kareen Lubas at lubaskar@msu.edu.

 

Here’s your file:

RESTORATIVEJUSTICE: A 2016 state law requires schools to consider restorative justice options before suspending or expelling students. Such practices emphasize repairing the harm done by a pupil, both to the victim and to the school community. What are districts doing about it? We hear from the Resolution Services Center of Central Michigan, a Houghton Lake school official and a Detroit advocacy group, Street Democracy. By Maxwell Evans. FOR BIG RAPIDS, LANSING CITY PULSE, CLARE, CRAWFORD COUNTY AND ALL POINTS.

 

SUICIDES: Men and rural residents are at higher risk of suicide than women and urban residents. Leelanau and Ottawa counties have the state’s lowest suicide rate, while Alcona, Oscoda, Lake and two U.P. counties have the highest rates. What’s being done to combat that trend? The Department of Health and Human Services acknowledges a shortage of mental health resources. We talk to Healthy Men Michigan, Community Mental Health of Allegan County and Community Mental Health of Ottawa County. By Crystal Chen. FOR HOLLAND, LEELANAU, LAKE COUNTY, MARQUETTE, SAULT STE. MARIE, BAY MILLS, ALCONA, LANSING CITY PULSE AND ALL POINTS.

w/SUICIDESTABLE: Five counties with the highest suicide rate (Alcona, Ontonagon, Oscoda, Lake, Iron) and lowest suicide rate (Leelanau, Ottawa, Washtenaw, Gratiot, Clinton). Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

 

DELAYEDRETIREMENT: A growing proportion of Michigan residents are working beyond 65, and that trend helps manufacturers that face a shortage of skilled workers. But what does that mean for the employment prospects of younger people? We talk to the Michigan Manufacturers Association, Age-Friendly Grand Rapids, Michigan Tech and state agencies. For news and business sections. By Agnes Bao. FOR GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, MARQUETTE, SAULT STE. MARIE AND ALL POINTS.

 

HEATING: An Ida lawmaker is leading the push to extend Michigan’s use of federal aid to help low-income households cover their heating costs. Co-sponsors include Escanaba, Hart and Battle Creek senators. The Trump Administration wants to eliminate the assistance program. We hear from the Menominee, Delta and Schoolcraft Community Action Agency; FiveCaps, a nonprofit serving Lake, Mason, Manistee and Newaygo counties; and Monroe County Opportunity Program. By Maxwell Evans. FOR BLISSFIELD, MARQUETTE, BAY MILLS, MANISTEE, LUDINGTON, LAKE COUNTY, ST. IGNACE, OCEANA, IONIA AND ALL POINTS.

 

AUTOMATION: With a shortage of skilled labor, employers are turning increasingly to automation. We learn more about it from the Small Business Association of Michigan, Michigan Manufacturers Association and Cadillac Area Chamber of Commerce. By Riley Murdock. FOR CADILLAC, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS AND ALL POINTS.

 

POTHOLES: This winter has been tougher than usual for Michigan motorists, and local road agencies are scrambling to patch potholes and make other repairs under difficult conditions. We hear from the County Roads Association of Michigan and road commission officials in Ottawa, Oakland, Washtenaw and Lapeer counties. By Colton Wood. FOR HOLLAND AND ALL POINTS.

 

PEPPERSPRAY: A proposal awaiting Senate action would let residents carry much stronger pepper spray for self-defense, putting Michigan in alignment with most other states. Critics say the change could seriously injure intended targets and untrained users. We talk to the lead sponsor, from Manton, and the Michigan Association of Chiefs of Police. Co-sponsors include lawmakers from Casco Township, Wolverine and Montague. By Crystal Chen. FOR CADILLAC, BIG RAPIDS, HOLLAND, CHEBOYGAN, ALCONA AND ALL POINTS.

 

SOLARLEASE: Some farmers are finding that leasing their land for solar power is more profitable than growing crops. We talk to the Farm Bureau, Michigan Environmental Council, MSU Extension expert and a Grand Traverse County Planning Commission member. By Agnes Bao. FOR TRAVERSE CITY, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, LEELANAU AND ALL POINTS.

 

PARENTALRIGHTS: It’s up to the governor now to decide whether to sign legislation that would strengthen the rights of parents who have already had parental rights terminated for neglect… The lead Senate sponsor is from Sheridan. We talk to a legislator, from Auburn Hills, who voted no and the Michigan Federation for Children and Families. By Gloria Nzeka. FOR GREENVILLE, CLARE, BIG RAPIDS, BIG RAPIDS AND ALL POINTS.

 

PIPINGPLOVERS: Piping plovers, which were endangered and nearly disappeared from the Great Lakes, are back on all five of the big lakes for the first time since 1955. Important populations are nesting at Sleeping Bear National Lakeshore, Wilderness State Park, Ludington State Park and Nordhouse Dunes. The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service tells us about efforts to protect them and the birds’ resurgence. By Steven Maier. FOR LUDINGTON, ST. IGNACE, CHEBOYGAN, LEELANAU, TRAVERSE CITY, OCEANA, MANISTEE, ALCONA, HOLLAND, BENZIE, MARQUETTE, BAY MILLS, SAULT STE. MARIE AND ALL POINTS.

w/PIPINGPLOVERSPHOTO: Great Lakes piping plovers are slowly bouncing back after their near-disappearance from the region 35 years ago. Credit: Vince Cavalieri.

 

PRESS&TRUST: Do Americans trust the press? What do they think about “fake news?” Do they have enough reliable sources of information? A new survey by Gallup/Knight Foundation answers these and related questions in “American Views: Trust, Media and Democracy” and emphasizes the need for the press to fulfil its role in a democratic society. Commentary for news and editorial sections. By Eric Freedman. FOR ALL POINTS.

CNS

 

CNS Budget – Feb. 16, 2018

Feb. 16, 2018 – Week 5

To: CNS Editors

From: Dave Poulson & Sheila Schimpf

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Tony Cepak at (517) 803-6841; cepak@msu.edu.

For other matters, contact CNS Director Eric Freedman at (517) 355-4729 or (517) 256-3873; freedma5@msu.edu.

Here’s your file:

TEACHERSALARIES: Average salaries for public school teachers in the state have dropped over the past five years, although the pattern varies by district. Some smaller districts have seen salary increases.  We learn about the Hillman, Burr Oak and DeTour districts, as well as hearing from the MEA and a Grand Valley State professor. By Maxwell Evans. FOR MONTMORENCY, SAULT STE. MARIE, MARQUETTE, STURGIS, THREE RIVERS, CHEBOYGAN, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, GREENVILLE AND ALL POINTS.

DEPOSITBILL: There’s another legislative push to add water, juice, sports drink and similar beverage bottles and cans to Michigan’s 10-cent deposit law. Milk products would be excluded. It coincides with the governor’s newly announced recycling initiatives that do not include expanding the deposit law. We talk to the lead sponsor, from Kalamazoo, the Michigan Retailers Association, Michigan United Conservation Clubs and Michigan Recycling Coalition. One cosponsor is from Ingham County. By Kaley Fech. FOR GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, LANSING CITY PULSE AND ALL POINTS.

TEACHERINCENTIVES: There’s a proposal in the Legislature to pay an annual bonus of $1,800 to STEM and special education teachers in low-income districts to make it easier for schools to recruit and retain them. Michigan has a higher-than-national average in teacher turnover. Sponsors are from Grand Rapids, Mason and Kalamazoo. We hear from the Michigan Council of Teachers of Mathematics and the MEA. By Bailey Laske. FOR GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, LANSING CITY PULSE, AND ALL POINTS.

PIPELINEVIDEOGAME: A new video game designed by an MSU professor features environmental fights over pipelines crossing Great Lakes landscapes, including the controversial Line 5 under the Straits of Mackinac. Oil and energy industry groups say it promotes ecoterrorism, an allegation the designer disputes. By Kate Habrel. FOR CHEBOYGAN, SAULT STE. MARIE, ST. IGNACE, TRAVERSE CITY, MARQUETTE, PETOSKEY AND ALL POINTS.

w/PIPELINEVIDEOGAMEPHOTO1: Players guide the thunderbird as it flies from right to left, striking objects and animals with lightning along the way. Image: Elizabeth LaPensée

CHARTERS: So far, unions haven’t caught on among teachers at Michigan’s 294 charter schools but the Michigan Education Association and the Michigan Alliance of Charter Teachers & Staff are trying to organize their staffs. We also talk to the Michigan Association of Public School Academies representing charters. By Crystal Chen. FOR GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, LANSING CITY PULSE AND ALL POINTS.

BIKESAFETY: At a time when bicycle-vehicle crashes are on the rise, a bill working its way through the Legislature would require driver ed programs to provide training about bicycle safety. The mandate is intended to reduce cyclists’ deaths and injuries. We hear from the sponsor from Hanover, the League of Michigan Bicyclists and the Michigan Driver & Traffic Safety Education Association. Other sponsors are from Battle Creek, Montague, Adrian, Chesterfield Township and Rochester Hills. By Agnes Bao. FOR PETOSKEY, HARBOR SPRINGS, LEELANAU, TRAVERSE CITY, CRAWFORD COUNTY, CADILLAC, MANISTEE, BENZIE, AND ALL POINTS.

CREDITREQUIREMENTS: When retired Clintondale Community Schools teacher Ken Austin started teaching in 1974, the vocational technical education department was largest department in the building. But credit requirements and funding cuts decimated the program there and across the state. Now employer and other groups seek to improve vocational education programs statewide by looking at such things as counting welding toward algebra requirements and computer programming as a foreign language. We talk to the MEA, Michigan Manufacturers Association. By Riley Murdock. FOR ALL POINTS.

VOTERRIGHTS: The League of Women Voters, ACLU and NAACP are pushing a petition to make it easier to register and vote though a constitutional amendment. But the Secretary of State says the current system works fine. By Gloria Nzeka. FOR LANSING CITY LIMITS, AND ALL POINTS.

INTERIMTEACHING: Lawmakers may make it easier for people with a bachelor’s degree to teach full-time while they work to become certified teachers. The intent is to get more teachers into the classroom by removing some requirements for a basic skills examination. We hear from legislators from St. Clair, Ann Arbor and Saginaw and the Michigan Association of Colleges for Teacher Education. By Casey Hull. FOR ALL POINTS.

CNS