Oct. 13, 2017 – CNS Budget

Oct. 13, 2017 — Week 6

To: CNS Editors

From: David Poulson and Sheila Schimpf

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Tony Cepak at (517) 803-6841 or cepak@msu.edu.

For other matters, contact Dave Poulson: poulsondavid@gmail.com;

Here is your file:

USEDCARS: Attention business editors. Sales of used cars and trucks in Michigan are rising, thanks in part to more vehicles coming off leases. They’ve been increasing for the past five years and show no signs of slowing. Unlike other states, Michigan sales of new and used vehicles tend to be less cyclical. We talk to dealers in Traverse City and Cheboygan and an executive with the East Lansing-based Michigan Automobile Dealers Association. By Carl Stoddard. FOR CHEBOYGAN, SAULT STE. MARIE, TRAVERSE CITY, LEELANAU, LANSING CITY PULSE, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS AND ALL POINTS

CRANE: Some lawmakers want to reverse 100 years of conservation and allow hunting of Michigan’s sandhill cranes. The move comes as hundreds of the 5-feet tall birds are expected to land at the  annual CraneFest on Big Marsh Lake in Bellevue. A Cedar Lake representative recently introduced a resolution asking the Natural Resources Commission, whose chair is from Marenisco, to add them — with a 6- to 7-foot wingspan — to a list of  game species, and to seek U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service approval for a hunting season. Cosponsors include legislators from Hudsonville, Grant, Manton, Walker, Clare and Lake City. Bill passed committee. Supporters say that the birds damage crops, particularly freshly planted corn. Conservationists say the birds still require protection. By Jingjing Nie. FOR MARQUETTE, SAULT STE. MARIE, HOLLAND, LUDINGTON, STURGIS, THREE RIVER, GLADWIN, OCEANA, ALCONA, MONTMORENCY, BAY MILLS, CHEBOYGAN, PETOSKEY, TRAVERSE CITY, PETOSKEY, CADILLAC, CRAWFORD COUNTY, GREENVILLE, BIG RAPIDS, MANISTEE, LAKE COUNTY, HERALD-REVIEW AND ALL POINTS

W/CRANEPHOTO: Sandhill cranes can grow up to 5 feet tallwith a wingspan of up to 7 feet. Credit: https://pixabay.com/en/sandhill-crane-bird-ornithology-1833587/

ORANGESNOW: A Plainwell company is turning orange traffic barrels into surfaces to ski on. It gives ski resorts, including Caberfae, Crystal Mountain and Caberfae, a jump on the season, and homeowners could also establish a small hill in their backyards. But don’t count on it as a hedge against global warming. By Stephen Olschanski, FOR CADILLAC, PETOSKEY, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, TRAVERSE CITY AND ALL POINTS.

w/ORANGESNOWPHOTO1: A Plainwell company, mSnow, is turning orange traffic barrels into artificial skiing surfaces for use in backyards and ski resorts. Credit: mSnow

and ORANGESNOW PHOTO2: A Plainwell company, mSnow, is turning orange traffic barrels into artificial skiing surfaces for use in backyards and ski resorts. Credit: mSnow

NOSTRICTER: For the third time in six years,lawmakers are trying to prevent state agencies from creating rules tougher than federal regulations. They back a bill that would allow only the Legislature to do that, unless there are exceptional circumstances. It would apply to rules that regulate things as diverse as business, pollution, manufacturing. Supporters say stricter rules put Michigan companies at an economic disadvantage. Critics say federal rules should be minimum requirements and states should be able to approve stricter regulations. We hear from Midland and Rockford senators. By Kaley Fech. FOR ALCONA, LANSING CITY PULSE, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS AND ALL POINTS

MEDICAIDLEAD: Michigan received $24.8 million in Medicaid funding to abate lead- contaminated buildings last January, the first state  to tap that source for lead cleanup. But a lack of contractors, awareness and reluctance to fill out paperwork has made it difficult to put those dollars to work. That has an impact in West Michigan, not just Flint. By Jack Nissen. FOR LUDINGTON, MANISTEE, HOLLAND, BIG RAPIDS, TRAVERSE CITY, PETOSKEY, CADILLAC, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, LANSING CITY PULSE AND ALL POINTS

GREENFRAUD: A fraudulent green energy scheme in Detroit cheated Chinese investors of $4,475,000, according to a federal indictment and Securities and Exchange Commission suit against the project promotor. He promised an eco-friendly “green energy” waste processing facility to recycle paper, process other waste and produce synthetic fuel. The Michigan Economic Development Corp. refused to authorize tax-exempt bonds for the project. Much of the money went to personal items such as Green Bay Packers tickets, his wife’s dental work and an $89,000 Cadillac. Investors who put in $500,000 each expected to qualify for U.S. visas. By Eric Freedman. FOR GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS & ALL POINTS.

Oct. 6, 2017 – CNS Budget

Oct. 6, 2017 — Week 5

To: CNS Editors

From: Perry Parks and Andi Brancato

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Tony Cepak at (517) 803-6841 or  cepak@msu.edu.

For other matters, contact Perry Parks: parksp@msu.edu

 

MICHIGAN JOURNALISM HALL OF  FAME: Nominations are open and due by Jan. 22, 2018. The induction ceremony is scheduled for April 15. For details on how to submit nominations, go to    

http://j-school.jrn.msu.edu/halloffame/nominations.

Here is your file:

LIQUORRULE: Some state officials want to eliminate a restriction that keeps liquor stores at least a half mile apart. They say it stifles competition. But opponents say it helps limit the number of stores in a particular area and protects small operators from getting squeezed out of business. A bill is moving through the Senate to keep the restriction in place. We hear from Grand Ledge and Wayland senators and Traverse City and Holland retailers. By Kaley Fech. FOR HOLLAND, TRAVERSE CITY, LANSING CITY LIMITS, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS AND ALL POINTS

MENTALHEALTH: Up to 64 percent of county jail inmates in Michigan have some form of mental illness. That has police scrambling to increase training to learn how to handle people who should be in mental hospitals instead of behind bars. Advocates say cooperation among agencies is at an all-time high. We hear from and about law enforcement and mental health experts in Oakland, Cheboygan and Kalamazoo counties, Clinton-Eaton-Ingham counties, AuSable Valley and Northern Lakes Community Mental Health, as well as the ACLU and Sheriffs’ Association. By Jack Nissen. FOR CHEBOYGAN, GRAND RAPIDSBUSINESS, METRO TIMES, LANSING CITY PULSE AND ALL POINTS

XMASTREES: While warm weather hangs on, Michigan Christmas tree growers are readying for another strong year of sales. Michigan ranks third in the nation in the number of Christmas trees harvested, supplying about 1.7 million fresh trees to the national market each year. We talk to growers from Mason and Manton, as well as the state and national growers’ associations. By Carl Stoddard. FOR CADILLAC, TRAVERSE CITY, CRAWFORD COUNTY, LANSING CITY PULSE, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, LUDINGTON, LAKE COUNTY, CHEBOYGAN, ALCONA, GLADWIN, MONTMORENCY, PETOSKEY, MANISTEE, BIG RAPICS, HERALD-REVIEW AND ALL POINTS

W/XMASTREEPHOTO: The Windy Hill Christmas Tree Farm in Thetford Township, north of Flint, is one of many tree farms in Michigan. The state is the third-largest Christmas tree producer in the country, after Oregon and North Carolina. Credit: Carl Stoddard

CLEANUPCRITERIA: Emergency rules for how much of a hazardous solvent can be left in contaminated  groundwater are set to expire Oct. 27. But the Department of Environmental Quality is proposing a new limit for the chemical responsible for a high-profile groundwater contamination west of Ann Arbor. Other affected sites are in Oshtemo and Metamora townships. The change may be the first among a series of revisions to cleanup criteria for up to 300 other chemicals. We also hear from the Michigan Environmental Council, Michigan Petroleum Association and a Wayland senator. By Kaley Fech. FOR GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, STURGIS, HOLLAND, THREE RIVERS, METRO TIMES AND ALL POINTS

ENROLLMENT  — Public school enrollment in Michigan will decline by more than 5 percent by 2025, according to one projection. It is one of only nine states facing that fate. That means even less revenue for struggling schools, whose expenses don’t drop in proportion to lower student counts. Officials say not enough young people are staying and having children in Michigan. We hear from an Allegan Schools official. By Jack Nissen. FOR HOLLAND, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS& ALL POINTS

FARMRUNOFF: Federal officials are launching a two-year study to determine the best ways to convince farmers in Michigan and across the Great Lakes region to help fight water pollution. The pollution has created conditions ripe for excessive algal blooms that perennially appear in Lake Erie and other lakes and bays and threaten water quality. The culprit: nutrient-laden runoff, much of which comes from farmland. We learn about the Saginaw River Watershed and the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative. By Steven Maier. FOR GLADWIN, ALCONA, CHEBOYGAN, MARQUETTE, SAULT STE. MARIE, LEELANAU, PETOSKEY, HARBOR SPRINGS, OCEANA, TRAVERSE CITY, MANISTEE, LUDINGTON, HOLLAND, BAY MILLS, ST. IGNACE, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS AND ALL POINTS.

LYNX: It’s scientifically feasible for the National Park Service to reintroduce the Canada lynx onto Isle Royale after the predator’s disappearance eight decades ago, according to a new study. The island has a sufficient supply of the lynx’s favorite food, snowshoe hares, to support a population of about 30 lynx. They’d probably be imported from Ontario. Meanwhile, the Park Service is expected to decide the controversial issue of whether to bring more wolves to the island to replenish that animal’s population late this fall or early this winter. By Eric Freedman. FOR MARQUETTE, BAY MILLS, SAULT STE. MARIE, CHEBOYGAN AND ALL POINTS.

           w/LYNXPHOTO: Canada lynx. Credit: U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Sept. 29, 2017 – CNS Budget

Sept. 29, 2017 — Week 4
To: CNS Editors
From: David Poulson and Sheila Schimpf

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Tony Cepak at (517) 803-6841 or  cepak@msu.edu.

For other matters, contact Dave Poulson: poulsondavid@gmail.com;

Here is your file:

HOTWEATHER: The record-breaking temperatures in late September combined with the lack of rainfall throughout the summer is drying out Michigan crops and cows. On the plus side: The heat produces better wine. We talk to commodity groups and farmers from Mason and Alma. By Kaley Fech. FOR TRAVERSE CITY, PETOSKEY, LEELENAU, LANSING CITY PULSE, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, HOLLAND, OCEANA, BLISSFIELD AND ALL POINTS

CRAFTBEER: Craft liquor distillers and beer makers could tap into a new source of funds for research and promotion under a plan to expand the state wine council’s mandate. A bill already reported out of committee would create the Michigan Craft Beverage Council that would include craft beer brewers, liquor distillers and winemakers. We talk to the bill’s sponsor from Oshtemo Township, representatives of beer, wine and liquor makers and the state. By Jack Nissen. FOR GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, MARQUETTE, BIG RAPIDS, LANSING CITY PULSE, METRO TIMES, STURGIS, THREE RIVERS AND ALL POINTS

UPPOET: The unofficial poet laureate of the Upper Peninsula has just published a new collection of poems, many of them heralding the scenery and wildlife of Northern Michigan. We interview Russell Thorburn, who lives in Marquette.  By Kate Habrel. FOR MARQUETTE, BAY MILLS, SAULT STE. MARIE, ST. IGNACE, CHEBOYGAN, PETOSKEY, HARBOR SPRINGS, TRAVERSE CITY, LEELANAU, ALCONA, CRAWFORD COUNTY, CADILLAC, BIG RAPIDS, MANISTEE, MONTMORENCY & ALL POINTS.

        w/POETCOVER: Russell Thorburn’s new collection of poetry, “Somewhere We’ll Leave the World.” Credit: Wayne State University Press

MOOSE: About 500 moose live in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. And as their numbers grow, so does their draw for tourism. There are another 1,600 of the animals on Lake Superior’s remote Isle Royale. With the wolf population there down to two, experts predict the number could double in three to four years. By Carl Stoddard. FOR MARQUETTE, SAULT STE MARIE, ST. IGNACE, CHEBOYGAN AND ALL POINTS

w/MooseSnow: The Department of Natural Resources surveys moose numbers from the air. Credit:  Department of Natural Resources

w/MooseSign: Michigan’s moose population is on the rise. Police reported 18 traffic accidents involving moose in 2016.  Credit: Carl Stoddard

 

Sept. 22, 2017 – CNS Budget

Sept. 22, 2017 — Week 3

To: CNS Editors

From: David Poulson and Sheila Schimpf

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Tony Cepak at (517) 803-6841 or  cepak@msu.edu.

For other matters, contact Dave Poulson: poulsondavid@gmail.com;

Here is your file:

ROADKILL: Turkeys in traffic: Michigan police agencies last year reported 232 traffic accidents involving turkeys. For the first time police are identifying how often four species of wildlife other than deer — bears, elk, moose, turkeys  — are involved in Michigan traffic accidents. Marquette, Oakland, Jackson and Cheboygan counties top the kill list for various species. By Jingjing Nie. FOR MARQUETTE, MANISTEE, SAULT STE. MARIE, ST. IGNACE, TRAVERSE CITY, PETOSKEY, CADILLAC, CHEBOYGAN, METRO TIMES AND ALL POINTS.

IMMUNIZATION: Parents wouldn’t have to learn about immunization and disease prevention to get their children waived from Michigan vaccination requirements under a proposed bill. But state health authorities say that the requirement has significantly lowered the rate of waivers Michigan gives while improving health. The state once gave the fourth most waivers but now ranks 11th. Houghton County has the highest waiver rate and Luce the lowest. By Kaley Fech. FOR SAULT STE. MARIE, MARQUETTE, LANSING CITY PULSE, METRO TIMES AND ALL POINTS

Editors: check vaccination rates in your county at: http://www.michigan.gov/mdhhs/0,5885,7-339-73971_4911_4914_68361-321114–,00.html

INFORMANT: Criminal informants could get a tenfold increase in pay under recently introduced legislation that would boost limits on payouts from $2,000 to $20,000. Sponsors include lawmakers from Mason, Oak Park, Lansing, Grand Rapids, Muskegon, Calumet and Warren. By Stephen Olschanski. FOR LANSING CITY PULSE, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, MARQUETTE AND ALL POINTS.

ZIKA: State and local authorities are ramping up surveillance for the species of mosquitoes that causes the Zika virus in the wake of their discovery in Wayne County. They are also on the lookout for piles of tires and other areas where standing water can serve as breeding grounds for the insect that carries a disease that can cause birth defects. We hear from state, Wayne County and Kent County health officials and experts at MSU, Michigan Environmental Council and DEQ. By Jack Nissen. FOR METRO TIMES, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS AND ALL POINTS.

STOUT&TROUT: Representatives of a wide range of environmental groups, government units and private companies gather several times a year for beer and casual conversation about the fate and future of the Great Lakes, including a recent gathering at an Ann Arbor microbrewery. We interview participants from the National Wildlife Federation and Great Lakes Observing System. By Steven Maier. FOR ALL POINTS

w/stouttrout1.jpg: Look out for these cutting-edge buoys on the Detroit River. Image: Kristin Schrader

LIFESKILLS – County jails have started to turn to programs that help keep inmates from returning. The lifeskills courses are similar to programs at state prisons, but aimed at offenders serving much shorter sentences at county jails, including Allegan County and Kent County programs. We also hear from the Sheriffs’ Association. By Jingjing Nie. FOR HOLLAND, GRAND RAPIDS AND ALL POINTS.

 

Sept. 15, 2017 – CNS Budget

Sept. 15, 2017 — Week 2

To: CNS Editors

From: David Poulson and Sheila Schimpf

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Tony Cepak at (517) 803-6841 or  cepak@msu.edu.

For other matters, contact Dave Poulson: poulsondavid@gmail.com;

Here is your file:

MARINEPATROL: State funding for county sheriff deputies to patrol lakes and rivers has dropped over the past decade with the decline in the boater registrations that support them. But at the same time the county marine patrols are rescuing an increasing number of canoers and kayakers – who don’t have to register their craft and support the service. That’s leading to calls to register the increasingly popular craft. We talk to DNR and sheriffs in Mackinac, Marquette and Huron counties. By Kaley Fech. FOR MARQUETTE, ST. IGNACE, MANISTEE, CADILLAC, BAY MILLS AND ALL POINTS.

OPIOIDCRISIS: A drug is saving the lives of hundreds of Michigan opioid addicts. But experts say it’s no solution for the epidemic sweeping the state and that it may even encourage further drug use among addicts. We talk to the Ingham County sheriff, the Department of Corrections and health experts from U-M and Southwest Michigan Behavioral Health. By Jack Nissen. FOR LANSING CITY PULSE, STURGIS, THREE RIVERS, METRO TIMES AND ALL POINTS.

SECONDARYROADPATROL: Speeding may be less risky business for Michigan drivers — officers are issuing fewer citations each year. But the drop is costing county sheriffs’ departments thousands of dollars each year that fund patrols of the state’s back roads and investigations into vehicle crashes. We hear from the Sheriffs’ Association and Office of Highway Safety Planning. By Stephen Olschanski. FOR ALL POINTS.

MTARVON: You won’t find Mount Arvon listed in many Michigan tour books, despite the peak’s lofty status as the highest point in Michigan. But these days, Mount Arvon is getting more attention from tourists and the just plain curious willing to climb Michigan’s most prominent peak. It also is attracting a national convention of mountain climbers in 2019. By Carl Stoddard. FOR MARQUETTE, BAY MILLS, ST. IGNACE, SAULT STE.MARIE AND ALL POINTS.

w/MOUNTARVONSIGN: Mount Arvon is Michigan’s tallest spot. Credit: Baraga County Convention & Visitors Bureau

CLIMATECHANGE:

A new study shows that people who have been affected by weather extremes have polarized perceptions of climate change: some are more concerned and some are more dubious. It found that people who spend more time outdoors are more concerned about climate change. We talk to a Michigan State University professor of agricultural, food and resource economics; the author of the study, a former grad student at MSU; and a national expert on climate change at George Mason University’s Center for Climate Change. By Jack Nissen. FOR TRAVERSE CITY, PETOSKEY, LEELANAU & ALL POINTS.

SUSTAINABILITY: MSU faculty and grad students explore sustainability in the Cadillac-Traverse City-Leelanau Peninsula area, including a trail system linking Northwest Michigan communities, a small-scale organic vegetable farm that supplies local restaurants with fresh produce, citizen-scientists alert for invasive aquatics, apple researchers and critics of an oil pipeline under the Straits of Mackinac.  Commentary by Eric Freedman. FOR CADILLAC, TRAVERSE CITY, LEELANAU, PETOSKEY, CHEBOYGAN, MANISTEE, LUDINGTON, BIG RAPIDS & ALL POINTS.

           w/SUSTAINABILITYPHOTO1: Seining for Great Lakes fishes with the Cerulean Center at Maple Bay Natural Area. Credit: Shari L. Dann

           w/SUSTAINABILITYPHOTO2: Nic Theisen discusses growing organic vegetables at Loma Farm near Traverse City. Credit: Eric Freedman

 

August 2017, CNS Budget

Aug. 16, 2017

To: CNS Editors

From: Eric Freedman & Dave Poulson

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Tony Cepak at (517) 803-6841 or cepak@msu.edu.

For other questions or problems, contact Eric Freedman, freedma5@msu.edu; (517) 355-4729 (office) or (517) 256-3873 (cell).

3rd SUMMER ENVIRONMENTAL NEWS PACKAGES: This is the third of this summer’s three regular monthly packages of Michigan environmental stories for CNS members, in partnership with Great Lakes Echo. Our regular weekly files will begin in September.

Here is your file:

PISCESPORN: Lake trout make noise in bed, and that discovery may help scientists and fisheries managers monitor spawning and improve Great Lakes spawning habitats. Much of the research was done near Drummond Island. MSU researchers were part of the study. We interview experts from the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hammond Bay Biological Station in Millersburg and the Great Lakes Fishery Commission. By Carin Tunney. FOR ALCONA, CHEBOYGAN, ST. IGNACE, SAULT ST. MARIE, BAY MILLS, MARQUETTE, HOLLAND, LUDINGTON, OCEANA, MANISTEE, PETOSKEY, HARBOR SPRIGNS, TRAVERSE CITY, LEELANAU & ALL POINTS.

w/ PISCESPORNPHOTO: U.S. Geological Survey researcher Greg Kennedy installs monitoring equipment at a lake trout bed near Drummond Island. Credit: Nick Johnson.

BROCKWAYMOUNTAIN: One of America’s most beautiful roads — Brockway Mountain Drive on the UP’s Keweenaw Peninsula — has just landed a parking spot on the prestigious National Register of Historic Places. Keweenaw County built the road in 1933 in the midst of the Great Depression in an effort to lure “automobile tourism” — and it still does — and create jobs. By Eric Freedman. FOR MARQUETTE, BAY MILLS, SAULT STE. MARIE, ST. IGNACE, CHEBOYGAN & ALL POINTS.

w/BROCKWAYMOUNTAINPHOTO1: Scenic Brockway Mountain Drive. Credit: Wikipedia.

w/BROCKWAYMOUNTAINPHOTO2: Scenic Brockway Mountain Drive. Credit: Copper Harbor Improvement Association.

DRIVINGSTUDY: A new University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute study finds driving is on the rise in American cities at a greater rate than the growth in U.S. population, while the gap between urban and rural driving has widened. We also talk to a Lansing transportation official. By Jack Nissen. FOR LANSING CITY PULSE & ALL POINTS.

BOWFISHING: Many anglers consider carp to be a “trash fish,” but fly fishing for carp is popular in northern Michigan. This year though, guides have cancelled trips and lost thousands of dollars because they can’t find the fish in Grand Traverse Bay and elsewhere. Some blame another growing sport: bowfishing. By Max Johnston. FOR TRAVERSE CITY, LEELANAU & ALL POINTS.

w/BOWFISHINGPHOTO1: Sam James catches a carp in East Grand Traverse Bay. Credit: Max Johnston.

w/BOWFISHINGPHOTO2: Dave McCool catches a carp in West Grand Traverse Bay. Credit: Dave McCool.

NEWRECORD: “The Road We Build,” a new album by Stephen Jones, a Central Michigan University history professor, highlights environmental and contemporrary social themes. They include the Flint water crisis, mining industry changes on the Marquette Range, the abandonment of housing in places like his own city of Detroit and the anti-pipeline protests at Standing Rock.

By Kate Habrel. FOR METRO TIMES, LANSING CITY PULSE, MARQUETTE, BAY MILLS, SAULT STE. MARIE & ALL POINTS.

w/NEWRECORDPHOTO: Cover of new album “The Road We Build.” Credit: Stephen Jones.

CNS

 

July 2017, CNS Budget

To: CNS Editors

From: Eric Freedman & Dave Poulson

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Pechulano Ali, (517) 940-2313, pechulan@msu.edu.

For other questions or problems, contact Eric Freedman, freedma5@msu.edu; (517) 355-4729.

2nd SUMMER ENVIRONMENTAL NEWS PACKAGES: This is thesecond of the summer’s three regular monthly packages of Michigan environmental stories for CNS members, in partnership with Great Lakes Echo.

Here is your file:

LAKESMUSIC: A Lansing couple’s forthcoming vinyl album, “Fair Mitten (New Songs of the Historic Great Lakes Basin),” pays homage to Michigan’s history and natural beauty. One song describes what the Michigan Territory was like during the War of 1812, ranging from beer to from trading. They were also inspired by a map of the Grand Rapids-Indiana railroad line because the idea of traveling from Indiana to Michigan by railroad to go fishing captured their imaginations. By Kate Habrel. FOR LANSING CITY PULSE & ALL POINTS. Continue reading

To: CNS Editors

From: Eric Freedman

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Pechulano Ali, (517) 940-2313, pechulan@msu.edu.

For other issues contact Perry Parks, perryrobertparks@gmail.com, (517) 388-8627.

1st SUMMER ENVIRONMENTAL NEWS PACKAGES: This is the first of the summer’s three regular packages of Michigan environmental stories for CNS members, in partnership with Great Lakes Echo.

Here is your file:

TRACKFISH: Biologists and scientists teamed up to track fish across the Great Lakes using sound— like the world’s biggest game of Marco Polo, but with fish. The Great Lakes Acoustic Telemetry Observation Systems is a network of researchers sharing fish-tracking data. We interview experts from the Hammond Bay Biological Station near Lake Huron, Grand Valley State and MSU. By Max Johnston. FOR ALCONA, LUDINGTON, MANISTEE, HARBOR SPRINGS, LEELANAU, PETOSKEY, HARBOR SPRINGS, ST. IGNACE, SAULT STE. MARIE, HOLLAND, MANISTEE, CHEBOYGAN, TRAVERSE CITY, OCEANA, BAY MILLS & ALL POINTS. Continue reading

May 30, 2017 CNS Budget

To: CNS Editors

From: Eric Freedman & Dave Poulson

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Pechulano Ali, (517) 940-2313, pechulan@msu.edu.

For other questions contact Eric Freedman, freedma5@msu.edu, (517) 355-4729.

CLIMATE CHANGE PACKAGE: CNS, in partnership with Great Lakes Echo, is providing a special six-story package of Michigan-focused stories about climate change. Each story can stand alone, be run as a series or be run as a package.

1st REGULAR SUMMER ENVIRONMENTAL NEWS PACKAGE AHEAD: Our first package of Michigan environmental stories for CNS members in partnership with Great Lakes Echo will move in early June.

Here is your file:

CLIMATEPACKAGE1MICHIGANIMPACT. Is Michigan the place to weather the climate? Tough call. On average, the Great Lakes region is 2 two degrees warmer than in 1912, according to MSU- U of M’s Great Lakes Integrated Sciences Assessment. “You’re literally looking at an ecological experiment taking place in front of our eyes,” the state climatologist says. By Jack Nissen & Karen Hopper Usher. FOR ALL POINTS. Continue reading

April 28, 2017 CNS Budget

April 28, 2017

To: CNS Editors

From: Perry Parks and Sheila Schimpf

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Pechulano Ali, (517) 940-2313, pechulan@msu.edu.

For other issues contact Perry Parks, perryrobertparks@gmail.com, (517) 388-8627.

BONUS WEEK AHEAD: This is the last original file of the semester. Next week (May 5) we will move a bonus file of stories that moved previously this semester but remain timely.

SUMMER ENVIRONMENTAL NEWS PACKAGES: Again this summer, CNS plans to move three packages – in June, July and August — of Michigan environmental stories in partnership with Great Lakes Echo.

Here is your file:

MAYDAYACTION: On May Day, workers and immigrants will rally to protest President Trump’s immigration policies under the slogan “Rise up.” The seven Michigan cities scheduled to participate are Detroit, Grand Rapids, Kalamazoo, Lansing, Pontiac, Battle Creek and Rochester. The action in Michigan is primarily sponsored by Michigan United. Other pro-immigrant groups are also supporting the event. By Chao Yan. FOR LANSING CITY PULSE, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS & ALL POINTS.

Two stories on pay equity: Continue reading