Lei Tang, a sophomore majoring in education.

Influx of Chinese students creates cultural challenges

The numbers of Chinese students, as the largest group of international students in the U.S., has increased dramatically in recent years, according to the Institute of International Education. The institute said that from 2005 to 2009 India sent the most students to the U.S. From 2010 to 2016, China became the largest source of international students in the U.S.

Chen was studying Fa Lun Gong book in her dormitory. ”I think I am different from other people. I do get in touch with Chinese culture. That’s because I practice Fa Lun Gong.”

Students deal with stereotypes while celebrating their Asian cultures

At Michigan State University, 5.8 percent students at the university are of an Asian heritage, according to the Office for Inclusion and Intercultural Initiatives 2015-16 annual report on diversity. That’s about 2,500 students. To understand what it’s like to be from an Asian racial background at Michigan State University, we interviewed three Asian American students — Sho Nakashima, Annie Chen, and Sarah Vang — and a student from China, Lei Xu. “For me, the most personally upsetting has been the stereotype that Asian immigrant families are privileged and wealthy,” said Nakashima, an MSU graduate who studied social relations and policy and neuroscience. He is a first-generation American.