BWL approves natural gas plant; environmentalists disagree

Lansing’s Board of Water and Light approved a $500 million natural gas plant that environmentalists argue should have been a renewable energy plant. During the BWL’s regular board meeting on March 27, board members gave final approval to replace the coal-powered Erickson Power Plant with a gas-fired power plant. The plant, which is expected to be completed by 2021, will reduce BWL carbon emissions by 80 percent. Although the BWL is working to rely less on coal, environmentalists worry about the impact fracking has on the groundwater. Hydraulic fracking extracts natural gas by using high pressure liquids to blast target rock formations apart.

MSU students prepare for finals week

As the semester approaches an end, many students at MSU are preparing for final exams and beginning to put their schedules together for the next school year. About four weeks are left in the spring 2018 semester and students are starting to sift through their class notes, study and work hard to reach their desired grade. Thomas Adams, a media and information major at MSU, said he is trying to read over his notes and study in advance to get good grades. “I’m just studying my butt off, mostly reading notes, going to study sessions, stuff like that,” Adams said. Many students also have class projects at the end of the semester.

Lansing School Board appoints 2 new members

The Lansing School Board appointed two new members to the board at a regular meeting on Feb. 1. After a 4-3 vote, Michigan State University Senior Research Associate Nathan Burroughs and CEO/Leader Physician at Care Free Medical Clinic, Dr. Farhan Bhatti, were chosen as the new members of the board. Burroughs, who interviewed for the position at the previous meeting via Skype, said he knows it will be a while until he feels confident with the dynamics of a school board. “Despite having some expertise I’m fully aware that I have a steep learning curve,” Burroughs said.

Lansing’s struggle for better roads

 

The poor road conditions have made commuting in Lansing difficult for many residents and employees who drive in the city. City Chief Operating Officer and Director of Public Service Chad Gamble is very aware of the road conditions affecting these residents and employees. “Certainly commuting affects their vehicle, the quality of the vehicle, the life of the vehicle, the safety of their trip, the time it takes them to get there; it’s something we’ve been working on for decades,” Gamble said. The slow maintenance of roads in the area is due to the lack of funding and high cost of maintaining roads, particularly in the state of Michigan. The annual street funding for the City of Lansing dropped significantly between 2009 and 2010 and has yet to make a comeback 7 years later.