Williamston City Council sees ‘spirited’ back-and-forth, developments in city manager search

What was once a calm Williamston City Council meeting turned into a heated debate within the city hall chambers, pitting the Farmers’ Market Ad Hoc Committee and the Williamston City Council. A “spirited back-and-forth” is how the newly-minted council member Daniel Rhines described it. The Williamston Farmers’ Market is set to run for May 20 to Oct. 14. It’s an annual tradition many residents are fond of — including a number of council members.

Williamston downtown holds ‘quirky’ secrets, sense of inclusion

Wander up the stairs of the Williamston True Value Hardware store, and it has its own storage room. There are remnants from the past, including a run-down kitchen and bathroom from decades ago. But the real treasure lies in the basement. Both the second floor and basement are hidden from the public eye, much like the nested relationship between businesses in the area. It’s there, just unseen.

Meet the 3 Williamston residents vying for the vacant city council spot

Among the trio hoping for the vacant spot on the Williamston City Council, they all have one key aspect in common: They’ve been residents of the town for decades. They won’t hear back from the city council until the Feb. 26 meeting — when the council makes its final decision — so they’re on standby. Otherwise, the three know how the minuscule details of Williamston well; fine-tuned over the course of their tenure residing within the town. Stephen Bartig’s a fourth-generation resident.

Williamston City Council welcomes newest member, to fill vacant position next week

While the Williamston City Council welcomed its newest member to its ranks — council member John Bisard — there is one spot still up for grabs. And for at least the next two weeks, it’ll stay that way: Vacant. As is procedure, the City Council met again Monday evening, as it’s wont to do every second and fourth Monday of the month. And as part of the agenda, the public servants interviewed the third and final applicant for the open spot, Paula Curtis. Curtis brings a Williamston-heavy resume, as she said she’s been in the town for the past 55 years.

Red Cedar Antiques offers chance to escape, wander in the ‘chaos’

Tucked away in a corner, in an otherwise small crevice of Red Cedar Antiques, a room labeled “comics” sits idly — scores of memories and nostalgia packing the cramped quarters. In another corner, sports memorabilia flashes the legacies of legends from Michigan State to nearby Detroit. Those particular items are owner Todd Goodrich’s brainchild, his fingerprints firmly planted on a number of goods within the store. Though it isn’t just him; he estimates he has around 26 dealers who stock his shelves with items from the past. “I really like comics, I like sports memorabilia,” Goodrich said.