Trump and Clinton Debate

Political fashion and one-sided criticism

Often in the political arena, women’s appearances are commented on and discussed more than their political agendas or accomplishments. The same pattern repeated itself in the 2016 presidential race. Public relations expert and former political consultant Kelly Rossman-McKinney expands on Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump’s style throughout their campaigns and what it means to be in the public eye.

Powerful women: a herstory

Women have overcome obstruction on their way to leadership positions, but plenty of obstacles still exist for women pursuing those roles. Hillary Clinton’s loss in the 2016 presidential election could be considered the ultimate heartbreak in a career of service and fighting to break through a glass ceiling of leadership opportunities, but her campaign for the presidency changed women’s history no matter the outcome. Meet other women, primarily from Michigan, who have also made contributions to women’s history and broke through barriers to achieve in many different fields of work.

Small businesses persevere to support downtown district

By Megan Cochrane
The Williamston Post

For decades, the birth and growth of small businesses has kept Williamston’s downtown alive, but they continue to encounter challenges. “I think Williamston now has more small businesses than they ever had,” said Barb Vandenberg, former chamber of commerce president and downtown development authority chair. There are more large chain businesses in town than in the past, but small businesses are a crucial element of Williamston’s economy. A business owner herself and 24-year resident of Williamston, Vandenberg has seen the town go through many changes. Along the rollercoaster track that is the small business sector, Williamston business owners continuously strive to bring the community together and add value to the unique town.

Williamston Theatre receives grants to help with maintenance, operation

By Megan Cochrane
The Williamston Post

The Williamston Theatre has been a landmark in town since it opened in 2006. However, it was not until 2014 that the small, not-for-profit, professional live theatre company took ownership of its building at 122 S. Putnam St. At more than 120 years old, the structure requires improvements and repairs. Funding for such maintenance is not always easy to find, but grants from several organizations have allowed the theatre to maintain a quality experience for audiences. According to Emily Sutton-Smith, development director of Williamston Theatre, the theatre’s annual budget is $471,000.

Firemen’s Association serves up breakfast and safety

By Megan Cochrane
The Williamston Post

Firefighters served up more than food Oct. 10 at the sixth annual pancake breakfast and open house at the fire station at 1296 W. Grand River Ave. The event’s purpose was to teach about fire prevention as part of national fire prevention week. It also raised money for the Williamston Firemen’s Association, said Tony Worth, president of the group. The money buys new equipment for the department and is donated to organizations such as the food bank.

Firemen’s Association to host pancake breakfast and open house

By Megan Cochrane
The Williamston Post

In celebration of fire prevention week, the Williamston Firemen’s Association is hosting the 6th annual pancake breakfast and open house on Saturday, Oct. 10. Between 8 a.m. and 11:30 a.m., members of the association will serve all-you-can-eat pancakes with scrambled eggs, sausage, hash browns, orange juice, milk and coffee at the NIESA/Williamston Fire Station, 1296 W. Grand River Ave. “It’s a fundraiser for the association, (which) uses it to buy equipment for the department,” said Capt. Scott Cochrane. “We also give money to local charities like the food bank.”

Tickets are $6 for adults, $4 for children under 12 or $20 per family.