Candidates vie to restore voters’ trust in Ingham County prosecutor’s office

By Max Johnston
Listen Up Lansing Staff Reporter

When it was announced that Stuart Dunnings was charged with 15 criminal counts including soliciting the services of prostitutes, it shook Lansing to its core. Dunnings’ controversial departure from the Ingham County Prosecutor’s office left many, like Lansing resident Nate Enstrom, with a sour taste in their mouth. “I think it shows how important integrity is. What are they doing if they’re not honest and open with their voters?” Enstrom said.

Board of Water and Light tests Lansing homes for lead

By Jaylyn Galloway
Listen Up Lansing Staff Reporter

It seems like a reasonable request: promise that tap water is clean. “I don’t know about everyone. I want healthier water,” Crystal Lewis, a Lansing resident, said. Lewis is just one of the Lansing residents that receive their water from The Saginaw Aquifer that is owned by the Board of Water and Light.The water is pumped from 125 wells that reach 400 feet below the ground. However, following the Flint crisis many were worried about lead being in their water.

Audio: Landlocked Lansing can have fun on the water

By Eve Kucharski
Listen Up Lansing Staff Reporter

Link to audio story: https://soundcloud.com/eve-kucharski/michigan-princess

Located in Grand River Park in Lansing, the Michigan Princess is a riverboat that has been there since the 1990s. It is owned by the J & K Steamboat Company, which is located in Grand Ledge, Michigan. It is there that another riverboat of theirs, The Grand Princess, is currently waiting to be put back in the water. The company also owns the Detroit Princess.

Lansing lacking in giving domestic abuse victims a place to sleep

By Ella Kovacs
Listen Up Lansing Staff Reporter

Domestic violence and relationship abuse happens all over the world, the United States, and Michigan. In big cities like Lansing, where there are many people in a concentrated area, it is vital for victims and survivors to have access–preferably easy access–to resources that will help and support them. For many women, the first resource they would think of is the police. But victims also need a place to sleep. Ruth Sternaman, a counselor at the Women’s Center of Greater Lansing, said that in the Lansing area, housing assistance for victims could be improved as well as child protective services.

Local brewing another draw to downtown Lansing …

By Alexander Smith
Listen Up Lansing Staff Reporter

Craft beer sales are growing, and so is the customer base. According to a recent Nielsen study, 35 percent of adults 21 and older are more likely to try a craft beverage. To 56 percent of those surveyed, “craft” means coming from a small, independent company such as a local brewery. Michigan has plenty in cities such as Grand Rapids and Ann Arbor, and Lansing is starting to follow suit. However, Lansing has trouble keeping people downtown after the workday is over.

… and that’s bringing young professionals to downtown

By Max Johnston
Listen Up, Lansing staff Reporter

Michigan’s craft beer industry is booming, with the number of breweries in the state doubling since 2010. Grand Rapids, Traverse City, Detroit and Ann Arbor have all been densely populated with breweries and craft beers for years. However, according to owner of Ellison Brewery & Spirits Eric Elliott, Lansing trailed behind the rest of the state when it came to craft beer. “After spending some time away from Lansing and coming back, I could just tell we were lacking in this up and coming brewery scene,” Elliot said. “Lansing was like a desert, you could go to Detroit, you could go to Grand Rapids, you could go to Traverse City to get cool handcrafted beers, but you come to Lansing and there’s wasn’t anything.”

Lansing summer programs offer variety for area youth

By Krista Wilson
Listen Up Lansing Staff Writer

Vernon Miller, Lansing resident and dad of two said his 6-year-old son and 9-year-old daughter participate in different programs through the Lansing Parks and Recreation camps. “It really is amazing to see how much my kids learn through activities that they find fun, while also gaining some type of learning experience,” said Miller. They are not alone, as the Lansing area is offering a number of programs to keep kids from having a dull summer. “We all remember our summers growing up and the camps are made to expose kids to things they may not usually do, like canoeing or kayaking on the river,” said Brett Kaschinske, Director of Parks and Rec of Lansing. “That’s what our programming is about, giving new opportunities.”

Jason Helman, Senior Program Director of Westside Community YMCA said, “The summer programs at YMCA give the youth an opportunity to achieve new milestones in their lives, build friendships, and learn core values.”

Brian Pingel, associate professor of Youth Studies at North Central University in Minnesota said, “Summer camp can be an absolute benefit to kids when it is relational-based and they have access to positive mentors.”

Helman said the YMCA offers education-based programs, sports camps, and even a cooking program to help students learn how to cook.

Hunger is not a stranger in Lansing

By Jaylyn Galloway
Listen Up Lansing Staff Reporter

For some in Lansing, food banks aren’t an option; they are a necessity. “The local food bank is how I afforded to keep my house fed,” Brenda Smith, a Lansing resident, said. At the time Smith and her husband were not only trying to feed themselves, but also the senior citizens that they took care of, she said. She had to get on assistance in order to keep everyone fed, because the money that their families provided wasn’t going to be enough. Like the local food bank Smith used to help her to feed her household the Greater Lansing Food Bank is up to take the challenge to feed as many people as they can.

Lansing comic shops holding steady in a digital era

By Alexander Smith
Listen Up Lansing Staff Reporter

You can count the number of comic shops in Lansing on one hand. With how accessible comics are elsewhere, it’s not surprising. “I have an app on my phone that has a ton of comics,” said Lansing resident Rolland Mollitor. “Physical books aren’t something I need. As long as I can read it, it’s cool.”

Lansing resident Savhanna Moore shares that sentiment.

Politics, economics, and emotions collide in debate over the fate of Scott Sunken Garden

By Max Johnston
Listen Up Lansing Staff Reporter

Malcolm X Street west of Washington Avenue was once densely populated with English Tudors and mansions of the Lansing elite. Now only two remain: The Michigan Women’s Historical Center & Hall of Fame and The Scott House and Sunken Garden. However, the Board of Water and Light is trying to replace the Scott House and Sunken Garden with a new substation, much to the chagrin of some in Lansing like Liz Harrow. “Mainly my objection is that it feels that Lansing is giving up on its downtown, or on REO Town,” Harrow said. “They have decided that this unsightly compromise is good enough for a small city with low ambitions.”