Board of Water and Light tests Lansing homes for lead

By Jaylyn Galloway
Listen Up Lansing Staff Reporter

It seems like a reasonable request: promise that tap water is clean. “I don’t know about everyone. I want healthier water,” Crystal Lewis, a Lansing resident, said. Lewis is just one of the Lansing residents that receive their water from The Saginaw Aquifer that is owned by the Board of Water and Light.The water is pumped from 125 wells that reach 400 feet below the ground. However, following the Flint crisis many were worried about lead being in their water.

Hunger is not a stranger in Lansing

By Jaylyn Galloway
Listen Up Lansing Staff Reporter

For some in Lansing, food banks aren’t an option; they are a necessity. “The local food bank is how I afforded to keep my house fed,” Brenda Smith, a Lansing resident, said. At the time Smith and her husband were not only trying to feed themselves, but also the senior citizens that they took care of, she said. She had to get on assistance in order to keep everyone fed, because the money that their families provided wasn’t going to be enough. Like the local food bank Smith used to help her to feed her household the Greater Lansing Food Bank is up to take the challenge to feed as many people as they can.

Lansing welcomes Women’s Premiere Soccer League franchise

By Jaylyn Galloway
Listen Up Lansing Staff Reporter

“I play soccer, because I like working on a team to achieve a common goal,” Jackie Baratta, a Lansing resident, said. It is important for girls to play sports to not only get the team experience — which will be important for school projects as well as future work experiences — it is also good mentally and physically, Baratta said. The sentiment of girls getting involved in sports is shared among the Lansing community as a new addition has been made to the Hope Sports Complex/ hill SBC Soccer Club. The club will now have a semi-professional Women’s Premier Soccer League (WPSL) team. “We stopped after high school, now we continue for serious players in the womens’ soccer league,” Julie Mullin, general manager of the complex and owner of the Chill SBC Soccer Club said.

Aiming at pay equity, Lansing continues the My Brother’s Keeper Community Challenge

By Jaylyn Galloway
Listen Up Lansing Staff Reporter

Sometimes, Abdul Conde worries that even by going to school and doing everything he has to do, he will still be behind in pay. “As a young person of color I want to see a change in the wage gap because right now it is unfair,” Conde, a Lansing resident, said. Helping ensure that Conde gets a fair chance is part of the motivation behind the city of Lansing’s participation in President Barack Obama’s My Brother’s Keeper Community Challenge, now in its second year here. “This year for the challenge we are focusing on closing the racial economic gaps in the community,” Angela Waters Austin, the CEO of One Love Global, said. “We have milestones that goes from a person’s birth to their 25th birthday and this helps to come up with strategies to close gaps of young men of color and other beings left behind.”

Milestone include focusing on closing the opportunity gap in getting youths into the workforce and focusing on violence prevention and helping youths have a second chance to talk to law enforcement, according to the news release.

Lansing welcomes refugees to their new home

By Jaylyn Galloway
Listen Up Lansing Staff Reporter

The city of Lansing has become a melting pot of diversity as the community has helped to resettle more than 4,600 refugees in recent years, according to the Community Profile Population Report. “We have diverse group of refugees each year as between 600 to 650 come to Lansing,” Marissa Nalley, the Community Outreach Coordinator for St. Vincent Catholic Charities said. A person is a refugee if they flee from their homes from either race, nationality, religion or opinion Nalley said. In the year 2014 the arrival numbers showed the biggest demographics that were coming from Somalia with 144 people, and Iraq with 179, according to St.