People and cellphones: A new normal

Cellphones have become an integral part of day-to-day life. Many people carry a cellphone with them, whether they use it to communicate, entertain themselves, stay current with the news or to conduct business. “I think I would do okay without it, but I am definitely addicted to social media,” Ehlana Whyman, a college student, said. “I don’t live at home anymore, I would miss being able to talk to my family.” Others love the services cellphones provide, but feel that they could manage without one.

Online classes allow for flexible schedules

Summer at Michigan State University doesn’t always mean it’s time for summer vacation. As degree requirements become more demanding, many students enroll in the university’s summer sessions as a way to get ahead or stay on track to graduate. Skylar Austell, a senior at MSU, is taking online courses this summer so that she can graduate in August. “Without the opportunity to take the classes, I would have had to do a whole other semester just for two classes,” she said. Both of her classes are online classes, giving her the opportunity to go home or travel for job interviews without missing school.

One teen’s passion for developing apps

Hussein El Feky first became interested in programming when he was 13. What started out as a passion for building things, ended up developing into a love for program and application building. “At that point, I only learned a lot of basic concepts from random articles on the internet,” he said. Two years later, El Feky, of Cairo, Egypt, caught “the programming bug” and started getting serious about building phone apps, specifically for Android. “My first phone was an Android device, and I can easily say I fell in love with the operating system,” he said.

Social media allows small businesses to grow

Before the age of technology and social media, getting noticed as a small business was nearly impossible in a world where large corporations are the go-to. Advances in technology have given small businesses an opportunity to grow and thrive in the market. Social media has become a crucial component for any business to be successful. Companies hire people just to run social media accounts and to promote the business online. In a day and age where people live online, having an online presence is imperative for maintaining customers and earning new ones.

Thanksgiving brings various traditions to MSU

With Thanksgiving this Thursday, Michigan State students are planning on celebrating the holiday with their family and friends. Students with international backgrounds have different ways of celebrating the American tradition. Chesca Alvarez, a senior from Novi, has a different Thanksgiving than everyone else. “My family actually eats Japanese food during Thanksgiving so we don’t really have, like, the typical Thanksgiving,” she said. While she can’t do Thanksgiving with her parents because they are in the Philippines, she gets to celebrate Thanksgiving with her siblings.

Guidelines prevent voter fraud in Lansing

The City of Lansing provided all precincts with guidelines and checkoff sheets for every step of the voting process in order to ensure the integrity of the process, said Robbin Bell, chair of precincts five and 45. “We always were meticulous,” Bell said. “Because of this, we haven’t felt the need to change how we go about things.”

The checkoff sheets list what job each worker is doing, what they have to do and how to do it.  

“You really have to go through the checklists,” Bell said. “Even when it comes to setting up the machines you have to go step by step or you could miss a very critical part and mess up the entire process.”

Bell said the system is simple and ensures that everything is connected in the start.

Brenke Ladder brings fishermen to Old Town

Whether it’s to head down to the river to relax and watch the water flow over the dam or to try and catch a meal, the Grand River and the Brenke Fish Ladder have become a communal place for people of all backgrounds to appreciate what nature and Old Town have to offer. “I come down to the fish ladder almost five days a week,” said Kurt Scobie, a fisherman from Everett, Michigan. “I love being by the water, it’s peaceful, calms me down and allows me to catch some dinner.”

The Brenke Fish Ladder was built in 1981 as a way to aid fish who were swimming upstream to spawn. Designed as a circle, the fish jump over barriers that slowly get taller and taller until they are safely above the dam and can continue up the river. “I fish here all the time,” said Azid Rodriguez, a Dewitt local who was fishing for catfish.