CNS Budget, July 26, 2019

This is the sixth of occasional summer bonus budgets of environmental stories produced by our partner, Great Lakes Echo. They will move periodically through the summer.

A crack in the Great Lakes Compact? Diversion plan prompts pushback

A controversial plan to divert 7 million gallons of water a day from Lake Michigan to a proposed international electronics factory was recently uphelp. But that hasn’t ended opposition by environmental groups or settled worries that this is the first crack in a regional agreement to keep 21 percent of the world’s surface freshwater where it is now: within the Great Lakes basin.

Suffering surfing: Third coast surf swell not so swell

Record water levels are threatening Great Lakes surfing. They are swallowing some surfers favorite beaches and changing how the bottom of the lakes affect the water above. Still, some surfers say that the high water could make accessible previously unsurfable stretches of lake shore.

Coffee shops take major steps to minimize environmental impact

Coffee shops across the state are working to become more environmentally friendly. Measures include growing their own plants to flavor beverages, reusing glass milk bottles, donating leftover grounds to community gardens, buying beans grown without pesticides and revamping their roasting systems. We hear from owners in Coldwater, Ann Arbor and Ypsilanti and from an MSU expert.

Minong Ridge Trail: One tough trek

It may be Michigan’s toughest hike, the 29-mile Minong Ridge Trail in Isle Royale National Park. Rustic and rugged, it lures backpackers seeking a challenge. Portions are a path in the woods, but much of it is a route along a rocky ridge where an occasional rock cairn is the only indication hikers are headed in the right direction. For news and outdoors pages.

CNS Summer bonus – June 21, 2019

June 21, 2019 – Summer environmental bonus 3

To: CNS Editors

From: David Poulson

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Tony Cepak at (517) 803-6841; cepak@msu.edu. For other matters, contact Dave Poulson at (517) 432-5417 or (517) 899-1640 poulson@msu.edu. This is the third of occasional summer bonus budgets of environmental stories produced by our partner, Great Lakes Echo. They will move periodically through the summer. Here is your file:

TRIBAL WATER QUALITY: The U.P.’s Keweenaw Bay Indian Community has applied to the Environmental Protection Agency for authority to regulate water quality on tribal land.

CNS Budget – June 14, 2019

June 14, 2019 – Summer environmental bonus 2

To: CNS Editors

From: David Poulson

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Tony Cepak at (517) 803-6841; cepak@msu.edu. For other matters, contact Dave Poulson at (517) 432-5417 or (517) 899-1640 poulson@msu.edu. Editors: Note that this week we placed images directly into the posts instead of as links to separate downloads. Let us know if that causes problems on your end. This is the second of occasional summer bonus budgets of environmental stories produced by our partner, Great Lakes Echo.

Cities are bird death traps of glass and light

Detroit kills the 13th most birds in the nation every spring, according to a recent study.

Chicago is the deadliest city for birds, according to the study ranking the bird-killing potential of 125 U.S. cities.

Detroit is 13th during spring migration and 15th during fall migration.

An unfortunate combination of building structures and placement in migratory flyways proves deadlier for birds than city size.

Power plants monitor groundwater for coal ash contaminants

A new national study sharply criticized electric utilities for their handling of coal ash that contains toxic materials.

The state’s two major electric utilities, DTE Energy and Consumer’s Energy, explain how they’re remediating such problems at their coal-fired plants, including ones in Monroe, West Olive and Essexville.

We talk to the lead author of the Environmental Integrity Project study, utility representatives, the Michigan Environmental Council and the Department of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy.