CNS Budget – April 27, 2018

April 27, 2018 – Week 1
To: CNS Editors
From: Eric Freedman & Sheila Schimpf
http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/
For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Tony Cepak at (517) 803-6841; cepak@msu.edu. For other matters, contact CNS Director Eric Freedman at (517) 355-4729 or (517) 256-3873; freedma5@msu.edu.  
LAST REGULAR FILE FOR THE SPRING: This is our final regular weekly file of the spring semester. You’re welcome to continue using prior stories and visuals from our website.  
UPCOMING: On Wednesday, May 2, CNS will move a special package of articles about campaign financing reported by our partner, Spartan Newsroom.

State ramps up opioid response

By COLTON WOOD
Capital News Service
LANSING — Last October, President Donald Trump called the nation’s opioid crisis a public emergency. Now, six months after his announcement, Michigan has taken more steps to strengthen the state’s battle against opioids. “The news has definitely been reporting on the opioid crisis for a while now, and, yes, it continues,” said Monica Gonzalez-Walker, the clinical implementation and engagement manager of Michigan OPEN — the Michigan Opioid Prescribing Engagement Network. Data published by the governor’s office says the number of opioid prescriptions dispensed has decreased by 10.7 percent since 2015. For the first time since 2011, the total number of controlled substance prescriptions dispensed in Michigan dropped to below 20 million.

State ramps up opioid response

By COLTON WOOD
Capital News Service
LANSING — Last October, President Donald Trump called the nation’s opioid crisis a public emergency. Now, six months after his announcement, Michigan has taken more steps to strengthen the state’s battle against opioids. “The news has definitely been reporting on the opioid crisis for a while now, and, yes, it continues,” said Monica Gonzalez-Walker, the clinical implementation and engagement manager of Michigan OPEN — the Michigan Opioid Prescribing Engagement Network. Data published by the governor’s office says the number of opioid prescriptions dispensed has decreased by 10.7 percent since 2015. For the first time since 2011, the total number of controlled substance prescriptions dispensed in Michigan dropped to below 20 million.

State ramps up opioid response

By COLTON WOOD
Capital News Service
LANSING — Last October, President Donald Trump called the nation’s opioid crisis a public emergency. Now, six months after his announcement, Michigan has taken more steps to strengthen the state’s battle against opioids. “The news has definitely been reporting on the opioid crisis for a while now, and, yes, it continues,” said Monica Gonzalez-Walker, the clinical implementation and engagement manager of Michigan OPEN — the Michigan Opioid Prescribing Engagement Network. Data published by the governor’s office says the number of opioid prescriptions dispensed has decreased by 10.7 percent since 2015. For the first time since 2011, the total number of controlled substance prescriptions dispensed in Michigan dropped to below 20 million.

State ramps up opioid response

By COLTON WOOD
Capital News Service
LANSING — Last October, President Donald Trump called the nation’s opioid crisis a public emergency. Now, six months after his announcement, Michigan has taken more steps to strengthen the state’s battle against opioids. “The news has definitely been reporting on the opioid crisis for a while now, and, yes, it continues,” said Monica Gonzalez-Walker, the clinical implementation and engagement manager of Michigan OPEN — the Michigan Opioid Prescribing Engagement Network. Data published by the governor’s office says the number of opioid prescriptions dispensed has decreased by 10.7 percent since 2015. For the first time since 2011, the total number of controlled substance prescriptions dispensed in Michigan dropped to below 20 million.

Catch more trout–if you can!

By KALEY FECH
Capital News Service
LANSING — Anglers fishing for brook trout in the Upper Peninsula this season can tackle portions of 36 streams where the daily bag limit has been increased to 10 fish. The season just opened and runs until Sept. 30. “It’s been an evolving issue,” said George Madison, a Baraga-based fisheries manager for the Department of Natural Resources (DNR). “For many years, the daily possession limit was 10 brook trout.

CNS Budget – April 20, 2018

April 20, 2018 – Week 13
To: CNS Editors
From: Eric Freedman & Sheila Schimpf
http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/
For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Tony Cepak at (517) 803-6841; cepak@msu.edu. For other matters, contact CNS Director Eric Freedman at (517) 355-4729 or (517) 256-3873; freedma5@msu.edu. UPCOMING #1 FOR EDITORS: Next Friday, April 27, will be our final regular weekly file of the spring semester. You’re welcome to continue using prior stories and visuals from our website. UPCOMING #2 FOR EDITORS: On Wednesday, May 2, CNS will move a special package of articles about campaign financing reported by our partner, Spartan Newsroom.

More alternatives needed for criminal suspects with mental health problems, advocates say

BY COLTON WOOD
Capital News Service
LANSING — As more communities in Michigan join the fight for jail diversion programs for inmates with special needs, Lt. Gov. Brian Calley said he hopes it will soon become a mainstream program. The Snyder administration created a diversion program to reduce the number of people with  special needs entering Michigan’s corrections system. “It was informal in the beginning, and then we formalized it part way through our first term,” Calley said. “I served as a chair of the diversion council, and its mental health diversion. That’s what we’re trying to accomplish.”
The program works with pilot committees from counties across the state that want mental health-related changes in corrections facilities
“Our system in the past has been a one-size-fits-all approach,” Calley said.

More alternatives needed for criminal suspects with mental health problems, advocates say

BY COLTON WOOD
Capital News Service
LANSING — As more communities in Michigan join the fight for jail diversion programs for inmates with special needs, Lt. Gov. Brian Calley said he hopes it will soon become a mainstream program. The Snyder administration created a diversion program to reduce the number of people with  special needs entering Michigan’s corrections system. “It was informal in the beginning, and then we formalized it part way through our first term,” Calley said. “I served as a chair of the diversion council, and its mental health diversion. That’s what we’re trying to accomplish.”
The program works with pilot committees from counties across the state that want mental health-related changes in corrections facilities
“Our system in the past has been a one-size-fits-all approach,” Calley said.

More alternatives needed for criminal suspects with mental health problems, advocates say

BY COLTON WOOD
Capital News Service
LANSING — As more communities in Michigan join the fight for jail diversion programs for inmates with special needs, Lt. Gov. Brian Calley said he hopes it will soon become a mainstream program. The Snyder administration created a diversion program to reduce the number of people with  special needs entering Michigan’s corrections system. “It was informal in the beginning, and then we formalized it part way through our first term,” Calley said. “I served as a chair of the diversion council, and its mental health diversion. That’s what we’re trying to accomplish.”
The program works with pilot committees from counties across the state that want mental health-related changes in corrections facilities
“Our system in the past has been a one-size-fits-all approach,” Calley said.