Journalism students cover election from new newsroom

Brittany Flowers talks to professor Mike Castellucci about the debut of the new College of Communication Arts and Sciences newsroom and the School of Journalism’s coverage of the election.

DeWitt’s Watershed Management Program serves a much bigger purpose than residents may know

By Brittany Flowers
Clinton County Chatter Staff Reporter

Protecting storm drains in DeWitt Charter Township that drain into the Looking Glass River is is the goal of a plan adopted by the township in 2006. The Watershed Management Program was developed by Shiawassee County. “The focus started from the federal level, the feds passed legislation requirements for watershed management and then that’s passed to each individual state. And then each individual state sets up their own program which is known as phase two,” DeWitt Township Manager Rod Taylor said. The management program is responsible for the Looking Glass River Watershed, the purpose of the management plan, water quality conditions, protections tools, action plans and other aspects of pollution prevention.

Could unusual weather threaten St. Johns’ most popular destination? Uncle John’s Cider Mill not worried

By Brittany Flowers
Clinton County Chatter Staff Reporter

ST. JOHNS — Uncle John’s Cider Mill is number one on the list of things to do in St. Johns, according to TripAdvisor, but with 2016 being an El Niño year, could Uncle John’s apple growth be threatened? For president of Uncle John’s Cider Mill Mike Beck, there isn’t much of a concern. “I can’t see a month from now what could happen but as of right now, I mean there is no bloom, the trees are just coming out of dormancy,” Beck said.

Clinton residents all have access to recycling all sorts of stuff

By Brittany Flowers
Clinton County Chatter Staff Reporter

Recycling is very much encouraged in Clinton County as a variety of recycling programs are offered to residents within the county. The Clinton County Department of Waste Management sponsors collection events nearly every month throughout the year. Recycling programs range from curbside pickup, to drop-off locations, and even collections of hard to get rid of waste. “The county itself oversees two — it’s like a collaborative effort but we oversee two drop-off recycling sites of the about 12 curbside to drop off recycling programs in the county,” Recycling and Waste Management Coordinator Kate Neese said. The programs offered by Clinton County are not all credited to the county itself, but also to the towns and cities within the area.

City of DeWitt embraces its history

By Brittany Flowers
Clinton County Chatter Staff Reporter

DEWITT — The area that is now known as DeWitt became a frontier settlement in 1833 when it was investigated by Capt. David Scott and his family, according to the City of DeWitt’s website. The population may have started small, but according to the United States Census Bureau the population has grown to 4,632 as of 2013, and the people of DeWitt have constant reminders of the history that lies within the city. If you take a walk through the City of DeWitt, you’ll find 29 signs scattered throughout the city that read “City of DeWitt Historic Site.”

City Administrator Daniel Coss said the historical program has been around for many years. “We feel it is really important to highlight the historical homes in DeWitt. These homes and the history behind them are what created DeWitt and are part of the city’s identity,” Coss said.

Community Showcase brings people together in DeWitt

By Brittany Flowers
Clinton County Chatter Staff Reporter

On April 14 DeWitt Public Schools will host the 5th Annual DeWitt Community Showcase. The event will showcase student achievement, and local business and service organizations. Planning began in January and Event Coordinator Monica Dennings said the whole purpose of the event is to get all of the community organizations together and showcase the great things DeWitt has to offer. “It originally started with our superintendent Dr. (John) Deiter, he did a showcase similar to this in his previous school district of Belding. So he had the idea to bring it here when he came to DeWitt,” Dennings said.

Clinton County keeping an eye on at-risk groups to maintain countywide health

By Brittany Flowers
Clinton County Chatter Staff Reporter

Infants, children and seniors are more susceptible than most people to illness and injury. And the large population of toddlers, tykes and the elderly in Clinton County means a proactive approach is key to maintaining community wide health. Helping keep an eye on county health is the role of the the Mid-Michigan District Health Department, which provides preventative health services for Clinton County individuals, families, and the workplace community, according to the county’s website. The general responsibility of the department is to provide direct health care for particularly high-risk or vulnerable population groups, of which Clinton County has its share. “Even though they are a healthy county they do have at-risk populations who aren’t healthy or who may be at risk,” Mid-Michigan District Health Department Public Officer Leslie Kinnee said.

DeWitt’s pride is in its parks

By Brittany Flowers
Clinton County Chatter Staff Reporter

DEWITT — According to the Charter Township of DeWitt website, surveys show that the excellent park system makes DeWitt Township a great place to live, work, and play. The township has nine park properties which total 200 acres. The city of DeWitt in particular has six major parks which include a memorial park and a sports park. Michigan.org refers to the city as a peaceful historic community and the city’s parks are a main reason DeWitt is seen as peaceful. The park system contributes to the overall commitment to the city’s community forest which has earned the DeWitt recognition from the National Arbor Day Foundation as a Tree City USA for 17 years in a row.

Finishing high school? Check. But St. Johns lagging in four-year college grads

By Brittany Flowers
Clinton County Chatter Staff Reporter

ST. JOHNS — The percentage of people 25 years of age or older with a bachelor’s degree in St. Johns is lower than the county, state, and national percentages. The national average of people 25 and older with a bachelor’s degree is 28.8 percent, while the percentage in the state of Michigan is at 25.9 percent, the county with 27.7 percent, and the percentage in St. Johns falls at only 20.2 percent, according to data from the U.S. Census Bureau.