Update to ‘Move Over Law’ in Michigan

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A $400 fine?

That is what Michigan is preparing to give out to drivers who display reckless driving behavior on the road, or, according to Captain Doug Monette of the MSU Police Department, is the opposite of, “Showing due care and caution on the road.”

This update is to further ensure the safety of emergency personnel doing their jobs on the highways and streets of Michigan.

It comes because after a dozen Michigan State police cars have been in accidents this year alone.

Now, drivers must slow down ten miles per hour below the posted speed limit as well as merging over a lane when approaching emergency vehicles.

Other emergency vehicles, such as firetrucks and tow-trucks, are affected by this bill.

Tow-trucks were not even classified as emergency vehicles until three years ago.

Josh Clayton, Owner of H&H Towing, he’s lost drivers over the years due to reckless driving. He said the bill does not make him feel inherently safer on the road.

In most accident situations, Clayton believes that the tow-truck companies have done everything they could do right and that drivers need to look at emergency personnel as people too.

“I think if we all just thought of the folks on the side of the road as having loved ones and families, and wanting them to go home safe to their families,” Clayton said. “Maybe we would all have a little different approach to how we drive