Downtown parking rates subject to a July 1 review

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Photo taken by Zach Sgro

Time run's out on meter before owner can return to pay again.

Mrs. L. Vinson paying at a new pay by plate meter in downtown Lansing.

Photo taken by Zach Sgro

Mrs. L. Vinson paying at a new pay by plate meter in downtown Lansing.

Whether it be a regular weekday or a special event like this most recent St. Patrick’s Day, parking in downtown has proven to be affordable and plentiful. With the implementation of pay -y-plate parking meters in recent years, by the Lansing Parking Services Department, the city continues to make an effort to simplify parking for citizens while effectively eliminating the old-school coin meters.

Aside from the high-tech improvements a significant amount of parking lots and garages that offer convenient and economical options.

“At times it can be a bit difficult finding a parking spot at one of the meters, but there are also parking lots available with plenty of spaces,” said Mrs. L. Vinson, a state employee.” “I work downtown and pay a monthly fee to have designated parking in a lot with in and out privileges.”

However good the prices or availability may be, there is still one problem that persists. Every year on July 1 the prices for parking in the city go through a review by the parking services department and are subject to change.

Map courtesy of the DTMB.

Map courtesy of the DTMB.

“I think on average the prices are pretty good in comparison to rates in other cities; however, metered parking in downtown Lansing is not consistent,” said Vinson. “It would be great for metered parking rates to be consistent, but I’m sure the difference rates are due to profit and demand.”

People around the downtown area do however have one complaint for the Rob Johnson, director of parking services in Lansing, before July 1. Citizens that frequent downtown, such as Eric Trojanowicz, a state employee, take issue with the amount of a time each coin can get you at a meter. Constantly going out and checking meters or adding more time can become a hassle for some people who choose to use the meters on shortened days, it can take away from the work they have.

“Every now and then I like to park at the meters on short days, but it can become a chore,” said Trojanowicz. I would like to see some more time on meters.”

Time run's out on meter before owner can return to pay again.

Photo taken by Zach Sgro

Time run’s out on meter before owner can return to pay again.

Although the price changes in spots around downtown, the parking services have set a cap between $83 and $170. If city-owned parking options aren’t financially feasible, there are other options for parking from companies like Ellis Parking, South Grand Parking, and the Ritz Carlton.

Prices for parking can be a bit out of ran for some patrons especially at lots or ramps that are most convenient for them. Conveniently there’s a variety of monthly permits that are offered by both the privately-owned companies and the city of Lansing, giving a broad range of price ranges and locations across 20-plus locations. For those citizens looking to chime in on the parking situation with compliments, concerns or ideas they should look to attend the City Council meetings leading up to the July 1 deadline.

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